Face Mapping: Let Your Skin Be Your Guide to Health

Our skin is a reflection of our inner body’s health, according to Ayurvedic tradition.  Ayurveda, “the science of life,” is a 5000-year-old form of natural healing started in India that focuses largely on maintaining balance. By looking specifically at the face, you are able to learn a lot about what might be going on inside of your body, and what might be out of balance in your life.
Face Mapping

1. Forehead

Possibly means: gallbladder and liver issues

The forehead, according to Ayurvedic practices, relates to the nervous system and digestive system.  This means that stress and internal stagnation could be the cause of the breakout here.  Find ways to reduce stress, like yoga or meditation, and reduce the amount of processed foods and unhealthy fats in your diet.

2. Left Eyebrow

Possibly means: repressing emotions in the spleen.

If you have a line on the left side, this could mean you have emotions pent up in the spleen.

3. Right Eyebrow

Possibly means: repressing emotions in the liver.

Cut out the alcohol, processed foods, and sugar.  Drink more water and add lemon to your water to rid the liver of toxins.  Get plenty of sleep and get in light exercise.

4 & 5. Eyes

Possibly means: impaired kidney function, dehydration

The skin around the eyes is typically connected to the health of the kidneys,  Signs like dark circles under the eyes often signals dehydration.  Small irises can tell you that you may have joint problems. If you have a yellowish color in the eyes, then this may be an indication of a weak liver.

6. Cheek

Possibly means: slow metabolism, low absorption of nutrients, lung issues.

The upper cheeks are related to the lungs.  Air pollution can contribute to this, or pressing your face up against a cell phone or dirty pillowcase. The lower cheeks typically mean problems with dental hygiene.

7. Nose

Possibly means: blood and heart issues.

Your nose is connected to your heart.  Swelling of the nose can mean high blood pressure.  Eat well to remedy this. Cut out sugar and processed foods, reduce spicy foods, caffeine and alcohol, lower salt intake, and eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

8. Lower Lip

Possibly means: intestines, digestion.

The lower lip is linked to the intestines.  Cut back on dairy products and oily meals and eat a diet consisting of lots of fruits and vegetables to keep digestion running smoothly and prevent blemishes.

9. Tongue

Possibly means: toxin buildup, lung issues.

We can learn a lot about our health by looking at the tongue.  White residue on the back of the tongue could mean it’s time for a detox, since this signals a buildup of toxins.  Abrasions or frothiness along the edges of the tongue could mean issues with the lungs, so implement regular aerobic exercise and meditation.  Uneven or ridged outer edges of the tongue often means that nutrients aren’t being absorbed properly into the blood stream.  Implement a diet of whole foods high in vitamins, iron, and folic acid, and steer clear of processed foods.

10. Chin

Possibly means: hormonal imbalance.

Stress and hormonal imbalances can be seen on the chin.  Expect to breakout around your menstrual cycle.  Get plenty of sleep, reduce stress, drink plenty of water, and eat lots of vegetables, especially the leafy green ones.

What’s the lesson here for perfect skin?  Drink lots of water, get plenty of sleep, eat whole foods, especially lots of vitamin-rich vegetables, make time for meditation or stress-relieving activities, and exercise.

Sources: MindBodyGreen, Into The Gloss

Health Benefits of Honey

To some, honey may seem like a “naughty” sugary treat, grouped in with white sugar or sweeteners.  Really though, honey is a fantastic superfood to incorporate into your diet, as long as you know the right honey to buy.

honeyDue to diet, our environment, and stressful, crazy lives, lots of us rely on coffee or caffeine to get through the day. Sometimes, often around 3PM, I know I find myself nibbling on chocolate for the energy boost, but some hot tea with honey or toast with honey are much better ways to get that energy I’m hoping for.  In the mornings I like to add honey to my breakfast smoothies before or after a workout, because honey boosts performance and endurance and reduces muscle fatigue.

Honey is a powerful immune system booster.  It’s antioxidant properties help the digestive system and aid in cancer prevention. I like to put some honey in my tea or hot water with lemon, especially if I’m sick or have a sore throat. So soothing.  For centuries people have used honey to repair cuts and burns also.  Other health issues honey can help with are allergies, arthritis, yeast infections, athlete foot, and trouble sleeping.  Honey reportedly helps hangovers too!

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My morning smoothie. Organic strawberries, banana, a couple handfuls of spinach, 2% Greek yogurt, almond milk, chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seeds, and organic, locally-harvested bee pollen.

In India, Ayurvedic medicine has used honey for thousands of years for healing and balancing the body.  Ayurvedic medicine reports that honey improves eyesight, weight loss, cures impotence and premature ejaculation, urinary tract disorders, bronchial asthma, diarrhea, and nausea (Source: care2.com).

unnamed-2There’s some debate about the practices used to harvest bee pollen.  Bee pollen is loved by health enthusiasts for its superfood qualities and high levels of protein.  My photo above is actually of my bee pollen, but I bought it straight from the bee keeper at my local farmers market and was aware of his practices.  I have read that collecting the pollen can involve the death of large numbers of bees, but that’s something I need to research more.

So now that I have you convinced as to why you should eat honey, it’s important to know what honey to buy.  Go organic or locally-made and treat it as a medicine.  Stay clear of commercially-made honey.

Don’t:

-Don’t buy honey made outside of the U.S. Honey made in places like China is often mixed with other syrups.

-Don’t buy the commercialized, pasteurized honey.

-Don’t use honey as a sugar substitute.

Do:

-Buy locally grown honey.

-Buy organic or wild, non-pasteurized honey.

-Use honey in small amounts as a superfood.

-Use as a medicine topically for cuts and burns.

(Source: Renegade)

Vegetarian Moussaka Recipe

The other night I tried out this new recipe, which will definitely become a regular dish in my house.  Moussaka is a traditional Greek dish and is very filling, but also healthy. It was so easy to make and combines the healthy whole grain, bulgar, with eggplant and spices.  Even my meat-eating boyfriend thoroughly enjoyed the meal.

I found this recipe by Jeanne Kelley from Cooking Light on MyRecipes.com and am posting it here for you to enjoy!

vegetarian-moussaka-ck-l

  • 3 peeled eggplants, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices (about 2 1/2 pounds)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • Cooking spray
  • 2 cups chopped onion
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 cup uncooked bulgur
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 cups organic vegetable broth
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup 1% low-fat milk
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated fresh Romano cheese
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  1. Preheat broiler to high.
  2. Brush eggplant slices with 1 tablespoon oil. Place half of eggplant on a foil-lined baking sheet coated with cooking spray; broil 5 inches from heat for 5 minutes on each side or until browned. Repeat procedure with remaining eggplant. Set eggplant aside.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add chopped onion to pan; sauté 8 minutes. Add garlic; sauté 1 minute. Add bulgur; cook 3 minutes or until bulgur is lightly toasted, stirring frequently. Add ground allspice, cinnamon, and cloves; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in vegetable broth, oregano, and tomatoes. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until thickened, stirring occasionally.
  4. Melt butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add flour; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly with a whisk until well blended. Gradually add milk, stirring constantly with a whisk. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 5 minutes or until thickened, stirring frequently. Stir in cheese and salt. Remove from heat, and cool slightly. Add egg, stirring well with a whisk.
  5. Preheat oven to 350°.
  6. Arrange half of eggplant in an 11 x 7-inch glass or ceramic baking dish coated with cooking spray. Spread the bulgur mixture evenly over eggplant; arrange remaining eggplant over bulgur mixture. Top with milk mixture. Bake at 350° for 40 minutes, and remove from oven. Increase oven temperature to 475°. Return dish to oven for 4 minutes or until the top is browned. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.