Trout With Green Beans and Potatoes

Trout is incredibly healthy and similar to salmon in color and taste, though it’s a bit more mild of a fish. This recipe is simple and easy to prepare but uses the magical combination of butter, fresh herbs, and lemon juice to really enhance the flavor.  I also enjoy this dish with asparagus instead of green beans, especially right now while asparagus is in season.

This recipe serves two people and can be prepared in about 45-50 minutes by any beginner chef.  There’s not a whole lot of work involved and clean up is easy. Yippee!

Ingredients 

-1 lb fresh trout fillet

-1/2 lb green beans, stems removed & halved

-1 lb small red potatoes, cleaned and quartered

-Avocado oil or olive oil

-4 tbs lemon juice

-fresh herbs, finely chopped (rosemary, thyme, dill, tarragon, parsley, basil)

-1 tbsp butter, melted

 

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.  Heat a large pot with enough water to cover the potatoes.  Add salt and bring to a boil.  Add the potatoes and cook 10 minutes or until just tender.  Drain thoroughly.
  2. Spread the greens beans in a large pan with the potatoes.  Add salt and pepper.  Pat the trout dry and season with salt and pepper on both sides. Lay the fish skin side down on top of the greens beans and potatoes.  Drizzle the fish and vegetables in oil making sure everything is evenly coated.  Cook in the oven for 30 minutes.
  3. While the fish cooks, combine the herbs and lemon juice with melted butter. Plate your fish and veggies and pour the herbed butter over the food.  Enjoy!

Roasted Chickpea and Vegetable Pitas

I love me some fluffy, warm pita, but you don’t actually need to include it to enjoy this recipe if you’d prefer to leave it out.  The stars of this dish are the vegetables: roasted harissa cauliflower and honey carrots, crispy chickpeas, plus fresh, cooling radishes and pea shoots.  Paired with hummus, yogurt, and (optional) feta cheese and you have yourself a tasty meal filled with protein and veggies. Serve in a bowl, with whole grains or with warmed pita or naan. Don’t overcook the pita like I did in the photo above. Whoops.

 

IMG_6435.jpg
Roasted harissa cauliflower and honey carrots

 

 

Ingredients

(serves 4)

-1 can chickpeas, drained, rinsed & dried

-1 head cauliflower, chopped into florets

-2 carrots, thinly sliced into 1/4 inch pieces

-3 radishes, thinly sliced

-4 handfuls pea shoots

-parsley, chopped

-1 lemon, quartered

-1 tablespoon garlic powder

-2-4 tablespoons harissa paste

-2 tablespoons honey

-feta cheese (try sheep’s milk feta!  It’s easier to digest)

-1 cup Greek yogurt

-Hummus (homemade or store-bought)

-4 Pita or naan

-Olive oil

-salt, pepper

*Note — For this recipe, it is helpful if you have two sheet pans, but not necessary.  If you have sheets pans of different sizes, you can use the smaller one for the chickpeas and the larger one for the vegetables.  If you only have one sheet pan, just roast the chickpeas first then go on to roast the vegetables.

 

Instructions

  1. Heat stove to 400 F.  Line two sheet pans in foil. Wash and prep your vegetables.  In a small bowl, combine garlic powder, a squirt of harissa paste, about 1/4 cup olive oil, salt, and pepper.  In a large bowl, combine the rinsed chickpeas and half the seasoning from the smaller bowl. Toss to coat the chickpeas thoroughly.  Transfer the chickpeas to a sheet pan.  Roast 40 minutes, shaking the pan halfway through.
  2. While the chickpeas cook, add the cauliflower to the large bowl with the remaining seasoning.  Toss to coat, adding more flavoring or oil as necessary, then place on one side of the other sheet pan in an even layer.
  3. Add the carrots to the large bowl.  In the smaller bowl, whisk together olive oil and honey.  Add to the bowl of carrots and toss to combine, scraping up any leftover seasoning.  Lay the carrots out in an even layer on the sheet pan next to the cauliflower.  Once the chickpeas have cooked for 10 minutes, add the cauliflower and carrots to the oven and cook for 25-30 minutes, stirringly every 10 minutes. The vegetables should be tender and golden.
  4. While the food cooks, in another small bowl, combine the yogurt with garlic powder, chopped parsley, salt, and pepper.  Drizzle olive oil on top.
  5. Remove the chickpeas and vegetables from the oven and set aside to cool.  Sprinkle your pita with a few drops of water and add to the oven for 3 minutes.
  6. Spread hummus and yogurt on your pita, then top with the chickpeas and vegetables, radish, pea shoots, and feta. Drizzle with olive oil and divide the quartered lemons among the plates.  Enjoy!

Green Lentil Salad

Who doesn’t like an easy, mindless recipe?  That’s what this lentil salad recipe basically is, plus, it makes great leftovers, is super healthy and tastes delicious!  I think it’s perfect for this season when the weather is warmer since our bodies are looking to be nourished with more cooling foods.

It’s best to prepare your lentils within a couple months of buying them as it’ll make cooking them simpler.  Know that it is best not to add salt or any acidic ingredients to the lentils until the last 10-15 minutes of cooking, as this will result in crunchy lentils even though they’re cooked.  Also, there are different types of lentils, therefore, different cooking methods required, so this recipe specifically calls for green lentils.

FullSizeRender (17).jpg

 

Ingredients

-1 cup green lentils

-2 cups chicken broth (or water)

-1/2 yellow onion, chopped

-2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

-1 bay leaf

-1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese

-1 avocado, cubed

-2 cups romaine lettuce, chopped

-1 tablespoon pesto

-1/2 lemon

-1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil + 1 tablespoon

-Splash of red wine vinegar

-salt and pepper

 

Instructions

  1. Rinse lentils in a mesh strainer making sure to check for pebbles (remove pebbles if you find them).  Heat a medium pot over medium heat. Add a tablespoon of olive oil to the pot.  Once hot, add the onion, garlic, salt, and pepper.  Cook for 30 seconds or until softened and aromatic.
  2. Add the lentils and bay leaf to the pot with broth or water.  Turn heat up to medium-high.  Once at a gentle boil, turn heat down and simmer for 45 minutes. Add salt to the pot the last 10 minutes of cooking.  Remove from the heat and keep covered for at least 10 minutes so lentils can soak up the rest of the water.
  3. While the lentils finish cooking, make the dressing by mixing together olive oil, red wine vinegar, lemon juice, salt, and pepper in a small cup or bowl.
  4. To a large bowl, add the chopped lettuce, lentils, feta, avocado, pesto, and the dressing.  Option to serve with a side of toasted pita bread.  Enjoy!

Nourishing Rice Bowl

IMG_4061.JPG

 

Grains, protein, and veggies all in one dish.  Serve for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Ingredients

-1 cup sushi rice, cooked

-1 piece salmon

-2 eggs, scrambled

-1/2 cucumber

-1 head of broccoli

-green onions with white bottoms and green tops sliced thinly and separated

-sesame seeds

-2 tablespoons tamari

-1 tablespoon honey

-1 tablespoon olive oil, coconut oil, or toasted sesame oil

-1 teaspoon garlic powder

-salt, pepper

*Note- I typically eyeball ingredients, so measurements in instructions might be a little off.

 

Instructions

  1. Set oven to 400 degrees F.  Place salmon in a zip lock bag.  In a small bowl, combine and whisk together tamari, honey, olive oil, garlic powder, salt and pepper.  Pour the sauce into the bag with the fish and let the salmon marinate for at 10 minutes.  Save any remaining sauce.
  2. Toss broccoli and the whites of the onions in a large bowl with remaining sauce.  Add salt and pepper, plus some extra olive oil if necessary so that broccoli is evenly coated.
  3. Line a baking sheet with tin foil.  Place the salmon and vegetables on the baking sheet and cook in the oven for 15-20 minutes, depending on the thickness of the salmon.
  4. Slice cucumbers.  In a small skillet, scramble the eggs.  Remove eggs and put in a serving dish along with some sushi rice and the cucumbers.  Add the salmon and broccoli when they’ve finished cooking.  Sprinkle with the green tops of the onions and sesame seeds. Enjoy!

Serving Up Sunchokes Two Ways

It’s always a treat to come across an unrecognizable fruit or vegetable at the farmers market.  The last time I was out I spotted these small, ginger-like nubs I had never seen. Those little nubs turned out to be sunchokes, which are also called Jerusalem Artichokes. I’m not sure how common sunchokes are, but I highly recommend experimenting with them if you can find them.

If I had to describe a sunchoke, I can easily say it’s like a cross between an artichoke and a potato, but it looks a lot more like ginger as I mentioned before. Here is a photo:

Image result for sunchoke

 

These babies are flavorful and hearty, and a vegetable I honestly think most people would enjoy, even skeptics and picky eaters.  Sunchokes can be served as a side dish to a meal, but I enjoyed them in these two recipes:

 

Sunchoke and Roasted Garlic Soup

FullSizeRender (15).jpg

Ingredients

-1 lb sunchokes, scrubbed, cut into 1/4 inch pieces

-1 russet potato, medium

-1 yellow onion, sliced

-6 cloves garlic, peeled

-1 teaspoon ground nutmeg

-2 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes (adjust if you prefer more mild)

-1 tablespoon olive oil

-6 cups chicken broth or water (use bouillon cube for flavoring if using water)

 

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.  Toast garlic cloves in the oven for 5 minutes. Remove.
  2. Heat olive oil over medium-high heat in large pot.  When hot, add the sunchokes, potato, onion, crushed red pepper flakes,  nutmeg, salt, and pepper. Saute about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally until vegetables are lightly browned and softened. Add the garlic.
  3. Add the water or broth, more salt, and bring to a boil. Once boiling, reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 30 minutes minimum.  I prefer to keep it cooking for a few hours for an extra flavorful soup.
  4. Process the soup in a blender or with an immersion blender either until smooth or almost smooth, depending on whether you like some chunks of veggies.  Check for seasoning and serve.

 

 

Broccoli di Ciccio and Warm Sunchoke Salad

FullSizeRender (16).jpg

Ingredients

-1/4 lb sunchokes, scrubbed, cut into 1/4 inch pieces

-Three handfuls of broccoli di Ciccio

– Pomegranate seeds

-Honey goat cheese (or other favorite goat cheese)

-Handful of almonds, chopped

-Lemon slice

-2 cloves garlic, minced

-2 tbs extra virgin olive oil

-salt and pepper

 

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 425 degrees F. Mix broccoli di Ciccio in a large salad bowl with the seeds, almonds, cheese, lemon, remaining olive oil, garlic, salt, and pepper. Toss and put in the fridge covered.
  2. Line a baking sheet with tin foil. In a bowl, mix sunchokes with about 1 tbsp olive oil, salt, and pepper.  Roast for 15-20 minutes.
  3. Remove salad from the fridge and combine with the sunchokes. Serve.

4 Ways to Motivate Yourself When All You Want Is To Do Nothing At All

I was inspired to write this post based off how I currently feel on this cold, foggy day.  I’m working from home, and I want nothing more than to cuddle up with my dogs and hibernate.  However, that’s not an option as work has to be done. So, what do I do to motivate myself?  Here are some tips that work for me, so if you can relate to what I’m saying, please try these suggestions out!

 

1. Eat fat. 

Our brains are made up of about 60% fat and need fat to promote clear thinking and focus. Outdated research suggested people stay away from products containing fat, so for me growing up I typically ate fat-free products.  I can’t tell you how relieved I am to now know that healthy fats are actually an essential part of our diet.  Foods like avocado, salmon, coconut oil, organic grass-fed butter and egg yolks are all examples of healthy fats that most people should consume on a daily basis.  I personally don’t eat much dairy, but it makes me sad that I deprived myself of the delicious goodness that is whole milk and 2% Greek yogurt for so many years.  Fat-free products not only taste unsatisfying, but they are typically packed with preservatives and hidden sugars in attempt to improve flavor.  By eating more fat, especially earlier in the day, you can power your brain, enhance learning and memory, and protect yourself again future brain diseases.

To give you an idea of how I fit fats into my diet, here is an example of what I might eat in a day:

Early Morning Meal — My Daily Green Smoothie, which always includes chia seeds and hemp seeds

Breakfast — Two eggs fried in either ghee or coconut oil with vegetables sautéd in either coconut oil or olive oil over rice.

Lunch — Mixed green salad with avocado and a little olive oil with lemon and lime for dressing.

Snack — Apple with almond butter.

Dinner — Baked salmon with steamed broccoli over quinoa.

Fat sources for the day = chia seeds, hemp seeds, egg yolks, ghee, coconut oil, avocado, olive oil, almond butter and salmon.  If you focus on eating whole foods, it’s not so hard to get your daily fat!

 

2. Experiment with Essential Oils

Aromatherapy has been used for thousands of years to improve mood, aid with sleep, energize, fight disease, and so much more.  There’s pretty much an essential oil for just about anything you can think of.  For me, after years of taking pharmaceuticals to manage ADHD, essential oils, in addition to diet, have become my all-natural solution for staying focused.  There are different oils you can use, and there are also oils made of a combination of different scents.  My absolute favorite oil is by DoTerra and it’s called InTune.  It’s a combination of several oils, but it’s my go-to scent whenever it’s time to get working.  Other oils that work well, which are mostly found in InTune, are lavender, Roman chamomile, mandarin, ylang ylang (I love this scent!), frankincense (I love this one too!),  vetiver, and patchouli.

 

3. Use Cannabis

This recommendation might sound counterintuitive and also may not be a solution for everyone.  For me, I have found with certain strains of cannabis that I can manage my ADHD-tendencies.  I do live in California where just about anyone can get a medical marijuana card, so apologies to those of you who unfortunately don’t have access to legal medicine.  For those of you who do, certain strains can actually give you clarity, laser-sharp focus, and can get those creative juices flowing.  Of course, it’s always important to consult your doctor or bud tender first, since they will be able to recommend the best strains for your specific needs, but definitely ask if cannabis can be a good solution for you too.

 

4. Set Daily Goals 

There’s something about writing out your daily to-do list that makes it much easier to get work done during the day.  I think it’s because lists hold you accountable and help with time management.  I actually prefer to write my list the night before, so that I can know exactly what needs to be done when I wake up the following day.

The other part of goal setting, especially when you’re feeling unmotivated, is to set what I call “power hour” goals.  It doesn’t necessarily need to be an hour, but what I’ll do is set a timer for typically about 20-30 minutes and during this time I have to stay completely focused on one task, like writing a blog post.  When my timer goes off I then allow myself a five minute break to walk around and stretch. Sometimes on my break I even let myself check Facebook 🙂  The point is that this system forces my lazy brain to work hard with the promise of a reward.  Because I get to take breaks I don’t get burnt out this way, not to mention I get in a little exercise!

 

For more tips like these, please leave a comment or drop me a line on my website.  Let’s talk!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooking With Fat

Fats and oils are essential for cooking. They flavor and lubricate our food while also conducting heat during the cooking process. While in the past, many fats have received a bad reputation and been avoided, we now know that fast are actually fundamental and fantastic for cooking. However, because there are so many fats to choose from, many people end up cooking with the wrong fats or oils for their dish, or simply improperly using them. When cooking with fats and oils, it’s very important to know at what temperature that specific fat or oil begins to break down, also known as the “smoke point.”

Condiments494Every fat has a smoke point, be it butter, lard, or oil. If you’ve ever seen your pan smoke, typically after it loses that shimmery look, that is a sign that your fat has reached its smoke point. Once this has happened fat begins to lose its healthy properties and can start to take on an unpleasant flavor. Many oils these days will tell you right on the bottle what the smoke point is. The higher the smoke point, the more ways you can cook with the oil, and the higher temperatures you can cook at. Oils with lower smoke points are great for dressings, drizzling, or cooking at lower temperatures.

Here is a list of very common fats and oils and their smoke points:

  • Safflower oil – 510 degrees F
  • Light/ refined olive oil – 490 degrees F
  • Peanut oil – 450 degrees F
  • Clarified butter (ghee) – 450 degrees F
  • Sunflower oil – 440 degrees F
  • Vegetable oil – 400-450 degrees F
  • Canola oil –  400 degrees F
  • Grapeseed oil – 390 degrees F
  • Lard – 370 degrees F
  • Avocado oil – 375-400 degrees F
  • Chicken fat (schmaltz) – 375 degrees F
  • Duck fat – 375 degrees F
  • Vegetable shortening – 360 degrees F
  • Sesame oil – 350 degrees F
  • Butter – 350 degrees F
  • Coconut oil – 350 degrees F
  • Extra-virgin olive oil – 325-375 degrees F

For sautéing, use oil with a medium or lower smoke point, like extra virgin olive oil. When the oil in the pan begins to shimmer, add your food and cook away.

For searing, choose something with a high smoke point like peanut or vegetable oil. Heat it until it is just starting to smoke, then add your meat.

For stir-frying, choose an oil with a really high smoke point, like peanut or safflower oil. The idea it to get a thin layer of smoking-hot oil on the bottom of the wok before adding your ingredients.

8 Tips to Help Yourself Eat Better During the Week

We are busy people and not enough of us make the time to take care of our health. Eating well is much easier when we plan ahead, and even easier when we get other people involved.  When we designate one day for food prep, we allow ourselves more time during the week to rest, relax, and enjoy our pre-prepped food.  I recommend Sunday as the day for cooking and preparation.  This way, when our lives our full of stress and things to do, we have pre-prepped meals to look forward to.

Top tips for eating better during the week:

1. Make a batch of your favorite whole grains 

Whole grains can be very versatile.  I love to cook a big thing of rice or quinoa that’ll last me through the week. For breakfast I personally love putting eggs over rice with avocado and hot sauce, and then for other meals top the rice with vegetables or other forms of protein.  Fried rice is an easy enough recipe that’s always a favorite.  For more information and a list of all whole grains, click here.

2. Designate one day for prepping

As mentioned above, one of the most useful tips I have is to prep ahead of time. On your designated prep day, slice all your veggies, cook your whole grains, and soak your beans.  This saves time and makes eating healthy more realistic.

3.  Cook once, eat twice (or more!)

Prepare enough food while cooking to have leftovers.  Take advantage of the time you have to cook, because it can be hard to guarantee you’ll have time or even want to cook the rest of the week.

4. Keep a food journal

It’s easy to forget the meals we eat.  If your goal is to lose weight or discover what foods work best for your body, I always advise my clients to keep a food journal. Keeping a food journal not only helps us track what we eat eat and our portion sizes, but we can note things we are feeling emotionally or physically when we eat or after we eat. Identifying our emotions or even things we are feeling physically from eating helps us pinpoint food intolerances or allergies, and can even answer questions about other physical ailments.

From my own experience, it wasn’t until I started noting how I felt physically and emotionally after I ate processed foods and sugar that I was able to solve feelings of anxiety and depression. I realized those foods made me physically sick to my stomach, and I was also experiencing high levels of serotonin while eating the food, and suffering from low dopamine levels after the sugar high wore off.  Most of us probably aren’t conscious of these things as we’re eating and going about our lives, but once we stop and think about it, we may discover things we didn’t realize about our bodies.

6. Cook at home

I love going out to eat.  It’s convenient, there are lots of options, and the food tastes pretty good, but why not save some money and calories by cooking yourself?  When we eat out, there’s no way of controlling what exactly goes into our food.  I enjoy cooking because I know exactly where my food comes from, I have control over what I put in my food, and I get to pick what I want to eat.  Aim to eat at least two homemade meals a day, then work toward three meals at home a day.

7. Plan your meals

It’s much easier to eat well during the week if we take some time to plan meals ahead of time.  Make a grocery list and write out what you plan to eat every day. There’s no need to get fancy.  If you like having oatmeal for breakfast every morning and vegetable stir fry for dinner, then go for it!

8. Add in vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruit, and whole grains

By adding in more vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruit, and whole grains to our diet, we can naturally crowd out unhealthier foods and prevent unhealthy food cravings.  When we fill up on foods that nourish our body, we become more satisfied quicker, so we’re less likely to go for the desserts or snacks after we eat.

Looking for more tips?  Subscribe to my newsletter!

Pay me a visit at www.jkhealthcoach.com to learn more about how working with a health coach can benefit you and the ones you love!

Essential Oils for Dogs

Essential oils have amazing benefits not just for humans, but for animals too. Anxiety, relaxation, joint pain, breathing, digestion, insect repellant, antiseptic, healthy skin and tissue are just some of the issues essential oils can help animals with.  It’s amazing to see what happens when I let my puppy sniff lavender essential oil.  The crazy pup lays down and actually drifts off to sleep!smokey

Quality essential oils should be therapeutic grade and 100% pure.  I personally use doTerra essential oils, because they are the purest oils- Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade- and work really well for me and my family.  On my dogs I use lavender to relax them, OnGuard to keep away ticks and fleas (mixed with some coconut oil along their spines), and Serenity when we leave the dogs or take them in the car (one dog gets anxious in the car).

Below are my top picks for essential oils for dogs (and even for myself!):

AromaTouch: Circulatory Issues, Overworked Muscles

Balance: Promotes Relaxation and Supports Healthy Joints (Add in Deep Blue and Lemongrass)

Breathe: Supports Healthy Breathing, Reduces Inflammation

Deep Blue: Muscle Cramps and Pain Reducer, Wound Care

DigestZen: Supports a Healthy Digestive System

Frankincense: Promotes Relaxation, Helps Promote Healthy, New Cells in the Body, Insect/Snake Bites, Scarring, Supports Healthy Skin and Tissue

Helichrysum: Supports a Healthy Liver and Nervous System, Wound Care

Immortelle: Supports Skin and Tissue Health, Calms the Nervous System, Wound Care, Reduces Scarring

Lavender: Calms the Nervous System, Helpful for Skin Conditions and Wound Care

Lemon:  Promotes Relaxation, Electrolyte Balance, Maintains a Healthy Immune Response in the Body, Supports the Lymphatic System, Claw Strength

Melissa: Stress Reducer, Immune Support

OnGuard:  Immune Support, Improves Oral Health, Spider Bites

Oregano: Supports Respiratory Health and Maintains a Healthy Immune Response in the Body

Peppermint: Supports Healthy Breathing, Maintains The Health of the Digestive System, Inflammation, Muscle Pain

Serenity: Stress reducer, Burns, Inflammation, Nerve Pain, Scarring, Wound Care

Zendocrine: Kidney and Bladder Support, Liver Support

Essential oils can be pretty potent for animals, so you can mix a few drops of oil with about a tablespoon of coconut oil to put on topically, sprinkle some drops of oil in your hands and let the dog sniff, or use a diffuser.  Use caution with puppies under 10 weeks of age, very old dogs, or pregnant dogs.  Talk to you vet about essential oils and please make sure you are using top quality oils!  If you have questions about how to use the products, which oils to use, or specific questions about doTerra, please email me at jessicakhealth@gmail.com.

To learn more about what I do as an integrative nutrition health coach, please visit me at jkhealthcoach.com.

Homemade Pad Thai

Pad thai

Here are the makings of a homemade pad thai with my very own twist.  I like to load up on delicious green vegetables, so here I went heavy on the broccoli, bok choy, and green onions and added shrimp for protein.  What I especially love about pad thai are the peanuts. I normally order a side of peanut sauce for my pad thai, but for this recipe I actually added peanut butter.  I happened to have a fancy vanilla bourbon peanut butter, but I’m sure any smooth peanut butter will do the trick.

Ingredients:

-shrimp

-bok choy

-broccoli

-3 cloves garlic

-green onions

-chilis

-2 eggs, lightly scrambled

-fish or oyster sauce

-smooth peanut butter

-lemon or lime

-sesame oil or coconut oil

-pad thai noodles or preferred rice noodlesANE-52793-4

Steps:

1. Heat a pot full of water for noodles. Cook noodles.  When done drain, but set aside some water. Run cold water over the noodles.

2. Meanwhile, heat sesame oil and a little coconut oil in wok or large pan over medium high heat.  Sautee garlic, bok choy, broccoli, and shrimp.  Add salt and pepper.  Flip shrimp after about 3 minutes and cook until opaque. Bok choy should be wilted and broccoli cooked.  Transfer vegetables and shrimp to dish.

3. Add about a teaspoon more oil to the pan and add eggs.  Scramble eggs and add noodles to the pan.  Add fish sauce and peanut butter.  Add shrimp, vegetables, and chilis and turn off stove.  Mix everything, squeeze some fresh lemon or lime, and add more sauce and peanut butter to taste.