Roasted Butternut Squash and Apple Soup

Stay warm this Fall with my new favorite soup!

butternut-squash

Ingredients:

(Serves 4)

-1 butternut squash

-1 yellow onion, chopped

-1 small Granny Smith apple, chopped

-1 small Gala apple, chopped

-5 thyme sprigs

-2 tablespoons butter, melted

-1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil

-1 teaspoon sugar (optional)

-1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

-1 teaspoon cayenne (optional)

-salt and pepper

-4 cups chicken broth

Instructions:

1.  Heat oven to 400 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with foil.  

2.  Place squash in the microwave for about 4-5 minutes so that it’s softened and easier/safer to cut.  Remove both ends of the squash, then cut in half lengthwise.  Peel the tough, outer skin and remove the “guts” from the inside of the squash.  Continue to cut the squash into smaller, bite-size pieces.

3.  Place the squash in a bowl with the melted butter and thyme leaves, then generously salt and pepper.  Place on the lined baking sheet and cook in the oven for 40 minutes, flipping halfway through.  The squash should be tender enough to pierce with a fork at the end of cooking.

4.  When the squash has cooked for 20 minutes, heat a large stockpot over medium-high heat, and add the olive oil.  When the oil is hot, add the onions and optional sugar (generally I wouldn’t recommend sugar, but since this is a lot of soup, it’s hardly any sugar per serving).  Add the apples, nutmeg, salt, and pepper.  Cook for about 20 minutes, or until soft and fragrant. 

5.  In batches, add the cooked squash and onion/apple mixture to the blender along with a cup of chicken broth with each batch.  Blend until smooth.  Continue to add the squash, onions, apples and broth.  Season with salt and pepper to taste and garnish with thyme.  Enjoy!

Please Join Me For Some Health Talks

This Fall I’m excited to announce I will be hosting some health talks!  If you live in or around the Bay Area, then please join me for the following events:

1. Health Coaching: A Tool To Optimize Your Health

Learn how health coaching can help you reach your health and nutrition goals. We’ll discuss what health coaches do, what outcomes can be achieved and whether working with a health coach is right for you.

When: Tuesday, September 8 from 6:00pm-7:00pm

Where: Jewish Community Center, 3200 California Street, San Francisco

Price: Free

Heart-Health

2. Wellness For Women: A Three-Part Series for Overall Health

Week 1: Creating Balance In Your Life

Learn how to nourish your body and create balance in your life by focusing on the importance of quality relationships, career, spirituality, physical exercise, and nutrition.

Week 2: Choosing the Best Foods For Your Health

The foods we eat affect our mental and physical wellbeing. Welcome to Whole Food School 101, where you’ll learn how to choose the best foods for your health.

Week 3: Dealing With Food Cravings Caused By Emotional Eating

Learn about the effects of sugar on the body, how to deconstruct your sugar cravings, and how to reduce sugar intake to improve health and longevity.

When: Tuesday, October 6, 13, 20th from 6:00pm-7:15pm

Where: Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., San Francisco 

Price: $75 for members and $90 for non-members

About Me

unnamed-2Jessica Kleid is a native San Franciscan who’s always been passionate about food, fitness and living well. She received her training as a health coach from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where she studied over one hundred dietary theories and was trained in a variety of practical lifestyle coaching methods. Drawing on this knowledge, Jessica completely personalizes a “roadmap to health” that suits your unique body, lifestyle, preferences and goals.

Roasted Chicken Recipe

roasted chicken

I was shocked to learn how easy it is to roast a whole chicken.  Cooking that much bird might seem scary, but the key to a quality chicken, in my opinion, are fresh herbs, garlic, and butter.  It’s best to marinate the chicken a day before cooking (or at least an hour before!) to really let it soak up the flavors of the herbs, lemon, and garlic.  Also, make sure before cooking the chicken that you take the chicken out of the fridge and let it sit out for an hour to get to room temperature.

Items you’ll need for roasting a chicken:

-Roasting pan

-Kitchen string

Serves 3-4 people

Ingredients:

-2-3 lb whole chicken

-2 garlic cloves, diced

-1-2 lemon slices

-Fresh herbs (parsley, rosemary, oregano, thyme)

-salt and pepper

-butter

-2-3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

2. Rinse chicken well and scoop out giblets (if any) from the cavity.  Pat chicken dry with paper towels.

3. Liberally salt and pepper the cavity.  Then salt and pepper the outside of the chicken.  Stuff cavity with the herbs, garlic, and lemon slices.  You can tie up the legs of the bird with cooking twine if you have it.

4. Evenly coat the outside of the chicken with olive oil and stick some butter in the cavity.

6. Place chicken in the pan breast side up.  Cook for 1 hour and 15 minutes, using a spoon to baste the bird every 30 minutes with the juices in the pan.

8. Remove the chicken from the oven and let sit for 10 minutes before cutting and serving.  Discard the string and pour the juices from the pan over the sliced meat.

Mmm, Easy Applesauce!

Applesauce

Last night I made the best applesauce and it only involved four ingredients and a slow cooker!  Ya’ll need to try this recipe this Fall.

Ingredients:

-6 Apples(I chose organic Fuji apples)

-3/4 tsp cinnamon

-1/2 cup sugar

-1/3 cup water

1. Cut apples into bite size pieces.

2. Toss all ingredients in slow cooker/crock pot and cook on low for 8 hours, or on high for 4 hours.  When it’s done you made need to mash the apples a bit.

Applesauce1

Enjoy!

October Unprocessed Month- Can You Do It?

october-unprocessed-2014

This idea might seem completely laughable to some people, but October is the month to step up and take the challenge of eating only unprocessed foods.  The concept certainly can seem a bit unnerving.  A whole month without anything processed, how will we do it?

Our society has become so accustomed to eating packaged, processed foods that the idea of going a whole month without them seems totally daunting.  Health blogger, Andrew Wilder, started this challenge in 2009 and by 2013 had 15,000 people sign the pledge and take part.  Through the challenge Andrew found three ways to cut back on processed foods by following these three steps:

  1. When you eat grains, eat only 100% whole grains.
  2. Don’t eat high fructose corn syrup.
  3. Don’t eat hydrogenated oils, trans fats, or anything that’s been deep-fried.

Since starting my health coach training back in July, I’ve already made huge steps toward eliminating processed and fried foods.  It truly is amazing how much better your body feels and how quickly you’ll shed some pounds.  It became more noticeable how crappy I felt after eating french fries, pizza, or Milano cookies (some of my favorite junk foods) and how happy I felt after switching to healthier, unprocessed foods.

The goal isn’t to have the perfect diet, because that can become stressful and is just setting yourself up for failure.  In fact, Andrew even makes a point to say that if you need to make an exception that’s ok.  Just make sure the choice is deliberate and not out of habit.

However, there are so many delicious recipes out there, that why not treat your body better and try home cooking for yourself instead? Andrew has lots of healthy recipes to try on his site, so browse through and challenge yourself!

Click here for recipes

(Source: https://eatingrules.com/)

Eat Seasonally

I can’t believe it’s fall already.  Personally, I love the fall, the change in weather, the holidays, the layered clothes… I also enjoy of fall’s foods.  Time to finish up the last of the cold, refreshing fruits and veggies, like watermelon and corn, and to stock up on the produce seasonal to fall.

Eating with the seasons is important for our bodies.  Those fruits and vegetables that keep us cool during the hot summer months are not what we need during the fall and winter.  Historically, our ancestors ate with the seasons, consuming warm, meaty meals to keep their body temperatures up during the colder months.  Modern food processing makes us forget that we were never meant to eat certain foods in each season, although sometimes we do start to loose our cravings for particular foods as the seasons change.Fall produce

Fall is meant for warming, grounding foods, like sweet potatoes, carrots, onions, and garlic.  Also focus on warming spices, like ginger, peppercorns, and mustard seeds (Source: WhFoods).  Not only will foods taste better, but by eating what’s fresh and in season, we also get the most nutrients from our food.  There are less pesticides needed to produce in-season foods, and the prices are reduced for the produce that’s in abundance.

Here is a full list of foods that are in season during the fall months:

-Artichoke

-Beets

-Beet Greens

-Bell Peppers

-Butternut Squash

-Carrots

-Cauliflower

-Chard

-Corn

-Eggplant

-Garlic

-Potatoes

-Radishes

-Spinach

-Sweet Potatoes

-Wild Mushrooms

-Almonds

-Apples

-Chestnuts

-Cranberries

-Limes

-Pears

-Plums

-Pomegranate

-Rasberries

-Tomatoes

Meats in season:

-Duck

-Lamb

-Lobster

(Source: EattheSeasons)

Here are a few recipes to enjoy in the next few months:

Chicken Pot Pie

Curried Carrot, Sweet Potato, and Ginger Soup

Easy Artichoke Recipe