Do You Have Rushing Woman Syndrome?

 

I am a big fan of Dr. Libby Weaver. She is a Nutritional Biochemist who piqued my interest in hormones and women’s health.  Take Dr. Weaver’s quiz in the video and find out if you’re a rushing woman (or man).

If you discovered you are a rushing woman, then let’s talk!  I work with women on nutrition and stress management.

4 Tips For More Restful Sleep

If you feel that a full night of rest isn’t really important, think again.  Without restful sleep and enough of it, your entire health suffers.  Sleep is important for youthful skin, mental clarity, a strong immune system and for maintaining a healthy weight.  Not to mention you’ll make healthier food and lifestyle choices then if you’re tired and lacking motivation.  Even if you eat well and exercise enough, but just aren’t seeing the results you desire, it could be your sleep to blame.

 

Minimize Media Time

It seems most people are on their phones all day.  I am like most people, except that once I realized that the light emitted from my phone (along will all my other devices) impacts sleep quality, I replaced checking my phone or computer before bed with better habits. What happens is that our electronics and energy-efficient lightbulbs all produce artificial light. When exposed to this light in the evenings, our bodies circadian rhythm is thrown off.  During the day, these blue lights are actually meant to keep us alert, but at night they are harmful to our health.  These artificial lights will disrupt the secretion of melatonin, the sleepy-time hormone that influences our circadian rhythm.  A lack of melatonin and working the night shift has been linked to cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity (source: Harvard Health Publications).

So, what to do?  Minimize exposure to blue light at least an hour before bed.  You can also install dim red lights which have the least impact on melatonin and circadian rhythm. You can also purchase a pair of ultra-sexy, blue-blocking glasses.  They actually aren’t cute at all, but if you’re someone who has to be on your computer or up working late, I’d definitely consider buying a pair.

1. Create Calming Nighttime Habits

So now that you won’t be using your electronics before bed, you’ll need a replacement nighttime routine.  Instead of browsing Facebook in the evenings for probably the 100th time that day, I have some tips of other things to do.  Remember those things called books?  Try reading one.  Had a stressful day and have a ton of things on your mind? Journal or try coloring in a coloring book.  Feeling achy?  Take a warm shower or bath.  Have a significant other?  Talk to them.  Or try some of these other recommendations below.

2. Use Essential Oils

I have an essential oil for nearly every situation or ailment, but nighttime is when I use my oils the most.  Lavander, chamomille, ylang ylang, cedarwood, bergamot, and sandalwood are some of my personal favorites for calming my body.  There are a few ways to use essential oils, although my preferred methods are to diffuse them into the air using a diffuser, or use them topically on the soles of my feet, on my wrists, or behind my ears (the oils can be used topically on other parts of the body too).  Sometimes I will sprinkle a couple drops of oil on the bottom of my steamy shower so that the scent can rise all around me. Other times I will put a couple drops on a tissue, then rub it over my pillow. Just make sure you get quality oils, like the ones from doTerra, which are certified therapeutic grade.

3. Use Magnesium

Even if you’re getting enough magnesium in your diet, the body can actually only absorb about 50% of it.  Magnesium is beneficial for sleep in that it moves calcium for your bones to your bloodstream, thus acting as a natural muscle relaxant.  If you are someone who really struggles with sleep, I absolutely recommend taking magnesium supplements, bathing in a magnesium bath, or using magnesium oil.  To see what else magnesium can help with, check out its 101 uses.

4. Meditate

There are different ways to go about meditating, so figure out what works best for you.  To calm my mind and body before bed, I like to drape my lavender-filled eye mask over my eyes while I focus on breathing.  I start with even breathing by inhaling through my nose for about four seconds, then exhaling through my mouth for four seconds.  After breathing like this for a few breaths, I then switch it up to the 4-7-8 method so that I’m breathing in through my nose for four seconds, holding it for seven seconds, then exhaling through my mouth for eight seconds.  Try this at least three times in a row.  If I don’t do this, I also like to use the meditation app called Headspace.  It takes ten minutes of your time a day and is particularly great for those new to meditating.

 

Try out all these tips for quality sleep.  If you are still having trouble sleeping or are continuing to wake up feeling exhausted, then let’s talk.  Schedule a complimentary 50-minute consultation with me and we will get to the root of your health concerns!

Please Join Me For Some Health Talks

This Fall I’m excited to announce I will be hosting some health talks!  If you live in or around the Bay Area, then please join me for the following events:

1. Health Coaching: A Tool To Optimize Your Health

Learn how health coaching can help you reach your health and nutrition goals. We’ll discuss what health coaches do, what outcomes can be achieved and whether working with a health coach is right for you.

When: Tuesday, September 8 from 6:00pm-7:00pm

Where: Jewish Community Center, 3200 California Street, San Francisco

Price: Free

Heart-Health

2. Wellness For Women: A Three-Part Series for Overall Health

Week 1: Creating Balance In Your Life

Learn how to nourish your body and create balance in your life by focusing on the importance of quality relationships, career, spirituality, physical exercise, and nutrition.

Week 2: Choosing the Best Foods For Your Health

The foods we eat affect our mental and physical wellbeing. Welcome to Whole Food School 101, where you’ll learn how to choose the best foods for your health.

Week 3: Dealing With Food Cravings Caused By Emotional Eating

Learn about the effects of sugar on the body, how to deconstruct your sugar cravings, and how to reduce sugar intake to improve health and longevity.

When: Tuesday, October 6, 13, 20th from 6:00pm-7:15pm

Where: Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., San Francisco 

Price: $75 for members and $90 for non-members

About Me

unnamed-2Jessica Kleid is a native San Franciscan who’s always been passionate about food, fitness and living well. She received her training as a health coach from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where she studied over one hundred dietary theories and was trained in a variety of practical lifestyle coaching methods. Drawing on this knowledge, Jessica completely personalizes a “roadmap to health” that suits your unique body, lifestyle, preferences and goals.

How Kombucha Saved My Health

For me, kombucha was love at first sip.  It continues to blow my mind that a carbonated beverage is responsible for correcting years of my digestive and energy problems. By now you’ve probably seen a kombucha bottle at your local grocer and maybe you’ve tried it and maybe you’re scared to try it. Yes, there are living cultures in your drink, but don’t be afraid.  These lovely little creatures, aka, symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast (SCOBY), are responsible for fermenting tea into ‘buch. It’s pretty crazy too, because SCOBYs can live for years.  My SCOBY was passed onto me by someone who acquired hers in the early ’90s.  Kombucha starts off as tea with sugar, and the SCOBY lives off the sugar during the fermentation process. Don’t worry about the high sugar content at the beginning of the process. The sugar that goes into the drink at the beginning of the process is intended for that SCOBY to eat and break down into vitamins, minerals, enzymes and organic-acids.  Some of the main vitamins to expect from your kombucha are vitamin B and vitamin C, but basically, the kombucha culture is a health powerhouse in your kitchen.

Me and my baby SCOBY getting ready to make a new batch of 'buch.

Me and my baby SCOBY getting ready to make a new batch of ‘buch.

A Little History of Kombucha

The origins of kombucha are unknown, although it’s believed that the health drink started in Asia.  A Korean physician named Kombu was said to have treated the Emperor Inyko with the drink, which is why the drink is called “kombucha.”  After this, the drink allegedly made its way through the Silk Road, and ended up in households in Europe.  The drink made a disappearance though during WWII, since there was a sugar ration, so the ingredients to make the drink were hard to come by.  Apparently it wasn’t until the ’90s that kombucha started to make its comeback.

Kombucha and Its Health Benefits

My clients come to me with digestive troubles, unmanageable stress, insomnia, yeast infections, leaky gut, low energy, depression, weight problems, or in need or a good liver or kidney cleanse. 9 times out of 10 I prescribe kombucha to my clients, and I’d say 100% of the time my clients report back with amazing results.  There isn’t a ton of medical research on kombucha, but it’s been used for centuries to heal, and I’ve even experienced for myself the power of the ‘buch.  Other illnesses or problems that kombucha is said to help with are allergies, cancer, metabolic disorders, candida, hypertension, HIV, chronic fatigue and arthritis, though this is mostly from experimental evidence from people who’ve been drinking kombucha for awhile.

Kombucha is also a probiotic. Probiotics come in a variety of food or supplement forms, but drinking kombucha has become slightly religious for me. Probiotics add healthy bacteria to our gut, which is why it’s helpful with alleviating so many health problems.  Many of us unknowingly suffer from gut and digestive problems because of all the stresses on our body.  Stress from unhealthy foods, from toxins in our environment, from being overworked and exhausted, etc, all harm our health and the way things function inside us.  If you’ve ever taken an antibiotic without taking an accompanying probiotic, there’s a very good chance your insides are wiped clean of much of the healthy bacteria that’s essential for our health.  Taking probiotics will add back healthy bacteria.

My favorite brand and flavor of kombucha.

My favorite brand and flavor of kombucha.

Kombucha and YOU

Do you have a personal success story with kombucha?  Do you have questions about how kombucha or probiotics might help improve your health?  If so, then please email me at jessicakhealth@gmail.com or reach me through my website, www.jkhealthcoach.com.

Is Gluten the New Fat?

For the past 40 years, Americans have been lead to believe that any form of fat and all types of cholesterol were bad for us.  New studies have proven that this idea is outdated, but today, the new “evil” is gluten.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, chances are by now you’ve at least heard the word gluten.  There are entire sections at the grocery store devoted to gluten-free products and I don’t know about you all, but out of the blue everyone I know is suddenly gluten intolerant.

What is gluten?

Gluten, Latin for “glue,” is a name for proteins that act as an adhesive glue, keeping together foods like breads, pastas, flour, etc.  Gluten exists in wheat, barley, and rye and can be found in many products, whether it’s our food or personal care products, like toothpaste or shampoo.  The “sticky” nature of gluten makes it hard to breakdown and absorb nutrients.

t1larg.gluten.foods.gi

What are some symptoms of gluten sensitivity? 

Depression, inflammation, joint problems, gastrointestinal problems, or fatigue, ADHD, anxiety, hives/rashes, miscarriages, nausea/vomiting, sugar cravings, brain fog, malabsorption of food, dairy intolerance, irritable bowel syndrome, or infertility.

Inflammation can also cause “leaky gut,”which makes us more susceptible to future food sensitivities and puts us at risk for developing autoimmune diseases or neurological disorders in the future.  Some of these diseases linked to inflammation include: Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Autism, and Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), diabetes, Hashimoto’s thyroidtis, arthritis, or schizophrenia. People with Celiacs disease share these same symptoms but on a more extreme level.  It’s also possible that some people just don’t show symptoms, but are fighting the attack elsewhere in their body, like in the nervous system.

But didn’t we always eat gluten? 

Our diet has changed drastically from what our ancestors ate. We used to thrive off of high-fat diet, low-carb diets, but now our diet consists of mainly carbs and significantly less fat.

Ancestors                                  Modern Diet

-Fat 75% of diet                            -Carbs 60% of diet

-Protein 20% of diet                     -Fat 20%

-Carbs 5% of diet                          -Protein 20%

evolution_of_man

We have far more disease today and different types of diseases than we ever did before.  The majority of our great-grandparents and generations older than them died from old age, but today many of us are plagued by cancer, heart disease, brain disease, obesity, or diabetes.  The answer to this conundrum exists not just in genes, but in our food.

As you can see from the numbers above, most of us eat an unbalanced diet.  Our percentage of carbohydrate intake are at unnaturally high levels, which takes a toll on our bodies. The first sign of celiacs, however, traces all the back to the first century AD, when a Greek doctor named Aretaeus of Cappadocia wrote about the symptoms and used the word “celiac” to name the illness in a medical textbook.  Gluten has always been a part of our diets since our ancestors learned to farm and mill wheat.  The gluten we eat today, though, hardly resembles the gluten in our diet ten thousand years ago.  Today our food is far more processed and bio-engineering has us growing structurally-modified grains containing gluten that’s less tolerable.

So is a gluten-free diet for me?

Although I know people have healed themselves of ailments by removing gluten from the diet and although I’ve read the research on the links between gluten and neurodegenerative conditions, I full-heartedly believe in the idea of everything in moderation. I personally have not given up my bread products yet, but I eat much less of it and not every day, because a little bread every now and then probably won’t kill you.  The problem is, carbs, like sugar, can be addicting, so some people have a much harder time removing gluten from the diet.

One way to cut back on carbs, processed foods, or sugar is to fill up on proteins, vegetables, and healthy fats.  By adding in these other foods, it’s easier to naturally crowd out carbohydrates, processed foods, and sugar.  I highly encourage everyone to do research for themselves, rather than hopping on the bandwagon without really knowing why.  There are probably way more products containing gluten than you know, some which may be surprising, and I’ve listed some of these products below.  I highly recommend the book Grain Brain by David Perlmutter, MD if you’re looking for more research and information.

If you or someone you know has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Autism, Lou Gehrig’s disease (ALS), or diabetes, or if it runs in your family, then I would think it best to stay away from gluten.  If you’re eating gluten and finding yourself suffering from headaches, abdominal pains, or any of the other symptoms previously mentioned, then try at least one week of cutting out gluten and see if you can notice any improvements.

Which grains are gluten-free?

Amaranth, arrowroot, buckwheat, corn, millet, potato, quinoa, rice, sorghum, soy, tapioca, and tee.

gluten-free-grains

Which gains contain gluten?

Barley, bulgur, couscous, farina, graham flour, kamut, matzo, rye, semolina, spelt, triticale, wheat, and wheat germ.

Random things that contain gluten:

Cosmetics, lipsticks/lip balm, medications, non-self-adhesive stamps and envelopes, play-doh, shampoos and conditioners, toothpaste, some vitamins and supplements.

There are lots of other foods and ingredients that contain gluten, so do some research if you’re planning on going gluten-free.

Sources:

Perlmutter, David, MD. Grain Brain. New York, NY.  Little, Brown and Company.

Good Fats vs Bad Fats

Not everyone realizes there’s a distinction between fats that are good for us and fats that are not.  In fact, some fats are essential to our diets and we can’t live without them.  The word “fat” has a negative connotation, especially when well marketed products influence us to buy “diet,” “non-fat,” “light”/”lite,” or “low fat” foods.  The truth is, these “diet” foods aren’t any better for us, and compensate with processed sugar to still taste okay.  Sugar and processed foods, not so much fat, is the real problem with our diets.

To break it down, there are four different types of fat.  Two of these types are “good fats” and the other “bad fats.”

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are good for us. They benefit the heart, cholesterol, and overall health.

Saturated fats and trans fats are bad for us.  They increase the likelihood of disease and high cholesterol.

Beneficial fats are found in the following foods:

healthy-fatsMonounsaturated Fats:

-avocados

-nuts (almonds, pecans, hazelnuts, cashews, macadamia nuts, peanuts)

-olives

-oils (olive oil, canola, sunflower, peanut, sesame oil)

-Peanut Butter

Polyunsaturated fats:

-walnuts

-soymilk

-tofu

-flaxeed

-oils (soybean, corn, safflower)

-sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds

-fatty fishes (salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, sardines, trout)

-flaxeed

Saturated Fat:

-chicken with the skin

-fatty cuts of meat (beef, lamb, pork)

-whole fat dairy products (cream, milk)

-butter

-lard

-cheese

-lard

*A note about saturated fat-  there has been controversy surrounding the argument that all saturated fat is bad for our health.  It’s true that substituting saturated fats for polyunsaturated fats is much healthier.  Use olive oil instead of butter, for example, but do not replace your saturated fats with processed food, like a muffin or bagel in the morning instead of bacon. Just don’t eat bacon all the time.

There are also newer studies that argue whole fat dairy products may actually keep us lean and decrease the chances of obesity.  One possibility is that whole fat dairy products keep us fuller longer, thus lessening the amount we consume.  That doesn’t mean go out and eat tons of whole fat dairy, especially for those of us who already have high cholesterol levels. (Source: NPR: The Full Fat Paradox)

fats 

Trans Fat:

-stick margarin

-packaged snack foods (crackers, microwave popcorn, chips, cookies)

-commercially baked pastries (doughnuts, cookies, cakes, pizza dough)

-vegetable shortening

-fried foods

-candy bars

(Source: HelpGuide.org)