The Importance of Your Poop

Even though it feels a bit embarrassing to post about poop, there’s no denying that our bowel movements are extremely important. If you want to know what’s going on with your body and your health, then start by looking at your poop.

Let’s begin with the gut. The gut is the body’s second brain. In fact, it actually sends messages directly to our brain up top. It impacts mood, digestion, the immune system, and even how you think. While thought processes like writing or math are up to the big brain, the Enteric Nervous System (ENS), which runs down from our esophagus to our stomach, small intestine and anus, is comprised of 100’s of millions of neurotransmitters that affect mental state and contribute to certain diseases in the body (source: John Hopkins). This network of neurons is similar to those found in the brain and act as a complex circuitry allowing the gut to think independently, learn, remember, and even experience gut feelings. 80% of cells from the immune system are located in this digestive tract, so it makes sense that the colon can dictate your overall health.

Because of the impact your gut health has on mood and overall health, many gastrointestinal disorders like Colitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome stem from issues in the gut. When you poop, you eliminate toxins, and when you don’t poop those toxins build up and can contribute to disease and illness. Constipation can be caused by a disease, like Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or from something like stress or poor diet.

Are you pooping enough?

Your poop can tell you whether your body is properly absorbing the nutrients that you consume. Ideally, you should poop between 1-3 times every day, but no more than 5. If you’re pooping five or more times daily, this is likely diarrhea and can be dehydrating. Many people refer to having regular bowel function as being “regular,” but regular really means easily passing soft yet well-formed bowel movements anywhere between 1-3 times a day to 3 times a week (source: continence.org).

The type of poop you make is quite important. Thankfully, there is this handy dandy poop chart to help you identify your stool category according to research by the University of Bristol:

If your poop most closely resembles types 1-3, this indicates constipation. Types 3-4 are ideal; 5-7 indicate diarrhea.

What can you do to become a “regular” and healthy pooper?

If you’re not a category 3-4 pooper, then I have some tips for you!

If you really want to give your colon a good cleanse, try a colonic. Colonics cleanse your colon by flushing the large intestine out with warm water via the rectum in order to remove waste and exercise and hydrate the colon (source: SF Colonics). Some places that do colonics will even sell add-ons with the colonics, like coffee enemas or vitamin B implants.

Diet can play a huge role on gut health. Try adding more fiber to your diet since fiber gets waste to move through the intestines. Fruits and vegetables are a great source of fiber, and I highly recommend my Daily Green Smoothie for a powerful dose of fiber and vitamins needed to cleanse the body of toxins. I also suggest taking a daily probiotic and digestive enzymes. Probiotics can come in the form of food or supplements, but basically, probiotics are good bacteria that are essential to proper gut function and good health. Digestive enzymes will help you get the most from the nutrients in your food by breaking the food down into more digestible components. Even if you’re someone who eats well all the time, if you don’t have enough digestive enzymes you will not absorb all the good nutrition from your food (source: Whole9). Stress, low stomach acid, aging, and inflammation all are very common occurrences that can deplete levels of digestive enzymes.

Because of the direct link between the gut and colon, constipation or diarrhea can signal something stressful going on, whether it’s something emotional buried deep or something going on presently, like a big presentation at work (source: Harvard). To reduce stress, I can recommend a number of therapies which I’ve tried. These include health coaching, acupuncture, massage, psychotherapy, emotional freedom technique, or yoga. There are many ways to reduce stress on your own too, like breathing exercises, regular physical activity (but tailored to fit your body’s needs), essential oils, or a good ole’ warm bath.

I have worked with many women who suffer from chronic constipation. In fact, chronic constipation is a large, somewhat unspoken epidemic. I work with these clients to improve diet and lifestyle and to identify areas of stress or emotional trauma in their lives. If you’re someone suffering from gut problems, or if you would just like to improve your overall health, please set up a complimentary consultation with me so we can review your health history and discuss how health coaching can best help you.

I received my training from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where I learned about more than one hundred dietary theories and studied a variety of practical lifestyle coaching methods. Drawing on this knowledge, I will help you create a completely personalized “roadmap to health” that suits your unique body, lifestyle, preferences, and goals.

 

 

Know Your Blood Type: A Guide To A Personalized Diet and Lifestyle

Heart-Health

Can you imagine going into a job interview and one of the first questions you’re asked is “what is your blood type?” This question is expected in Japan and is actually gaining popularity around Asia. The Japanese believe that each blood type comes with it’s own set of personalities, so they use blood types to categorize people.

“As defined by the books, type As are sensitive perfectionists but overanxious; Type Bs are cheerful but eccentric and selfish; Os are curious, generous but stubborn; and ABs are arty but mysterious and unpredictable” (Huffington Post).

While blood typing is similar to horoscope signs in Japan, in the health world it is believed by some that blood types affect the digestive system, the way you exercise, and your susceptibility to various disease. If you don’t know your blood type, then you can get your blood work done easily.

Blood Type A– Agrarian 

Type As are generally categorized as cooperative, sensitive, orderly, settled, and cultivator. When the number of hunting game stock began dwindling in Africa, type As had to move out into Europe and Asia to begin agriculture, which is when type A evolved. As a result, type As learned to utilize nutrients from carbohydrate sources, which explains why As are better at processing carbohydrates and not as a great at digesting and metabolizing animal proteins and fat. If you’re a type A, aim to eat most of your protein earlier on in the day. Overall, type As do better on a vegetarian or vegan diet. Increase vegetables, tofu, seafood, grains, beans, legumes, fruit and decrease your intake of meat, dairy, kidney beans, lima beans, and wheat.

Calming exercises like yoga, meditation, breathing exercises and tai chi are most recommended for blood type A, since type A is more likely to internalize stress and have higher levels of the stress hormone Cortisol, which can lead to health factors like cancer, heart disease, or diabetes. Blood type As should do their best to avoid big crowds, loud noise, smoking, negative emotions, strong smells or perfumes, too much sugar and starch, overwork, violent movies or TV, extreme weather conditions, or lack of sleep.

While strengths of type A include easy adjustment to change in diet and environment, little need for animal foods and an immune system the absorbs and metabolizes nutrients more efficiently, weaknesses may include a sensitive digestive tract and a vulnerable immune system open to microbial invasion. The result of combining the appropriate foods and exercises, though, can result in high performance, mental clarity, greater vitality and increased longevity.

Blood Type B– Balanced

The origins of blood type B can be traced back to the Himalayan highlands, currently part of present day India and Pakistan. As the Mongolians swept through Asia, they began pursuing a culture dependent upon herding and domesticating animals. For this reason, type B does best as an omnivore, eating meat (except chicken), dairy, grains, legumes, vegetables, beans, and fruit. Type Bs should reduce their intake of corn, lentils, sesame seeds, peanuts, buckwheat, and wheat. These foods can contribute to weight gain, fatigue, fluid retention, and hypoglycemia. Type Bs should actually avoid chicken too. Chicken contains a blood type B agglutinating lectin in its muscle tissue that can attack your blood stream and cause a stroke or immune disorder.

People with blood type B are characterized as nomads, flexible and creative. Strengths of blood type B include a strong immune system, versatile adaptation to changes in diet and environment, a strong nervous system, and high tolerance for chaos. The only common weakness of type B is a tendency toward auto-immune breakdowns and rare viruses, although common health risks include type 1 diabetes, chronic fatigue syndrome, and auto-immune disorders like Lou Gehrig’s disease, Lupus, or Multiple Sclerosis. Although pretty opposite from type A in regards to diet, type A and B both have higher levels of the stress hormone Cortisol. Type Bs should get participate in moderate physical exercise with mental balance, like hiking, biking, tennis, or swimming.

Blood Type AB – Modern

Blood type AB is the most recently evolved blood type. Type AB is the only blood type that came to be as a result of intermingling (between type A and B) rather than evolution and environment. As a result, AB types share the benefits and challenges of blood type A and blood type B.  Blood type AB is described as rare, an enigma, mysterious and highly sensitive, and people with blood type AB often describe themselves as intuitive, emotional, empathetic, friendly, and trusting. This blood type is more designed for modern life. It’s the most adaptable, can process information quickly, and has a rugged immune system. Weaknesses may include a sensitive digestive tract, a tendency for an overly tolerant immune system that allows for microbial invasion, and trouble feeling understood by society. Type AB is most susceptible to heart disease, cancer, and anemia.

Type AB can have a mixed diet in moderation. Meat, seafood, dairy, vegetables, tofu, legumes, grains, beans and fruit are all okay, but limit the amount of red meat, kidney beans, lima beans, seeds, corn, and buckwheat. Avoid caffeine and alcohol and avoid eating starches and proteins during the same meal. Because type ABs tend to internalize emotions, anger and hostility, exercise will play a big role in stress reduction and maintaining a healthy emotional balance. Combine calming, centering exercises, like yoga or tai chi, with moderate physical exercise, like hiking, biking, tennis, or swimming.

Blood Type OOld

Strong, hunter, leader, self-reliant and goal-oriented are all words to describe people with O blood. Type Os thrive on intense physical exercise and animal protein. Exercise releases the build up of stress hormones which will also balance mood. Type Os can have bouts of excessive anger, tantrums, hyperactivity and manic episodes in response to stress. To manage this stress, it is recommended that you follow a diet of lean, organic meats, vegetables and fruits and avoid dairy and wheat which can cause digestive and health issues. Increase kelp, seafood, salt, liver, red meat, kale, broccoli and pineapple and reduce wheat, corn, baked foods, kidney beans, lentils, brussels sprouts, cauliflower and mustard. Also avoid caffeine and alcohol, especially caffeine because it raises adrenaline and noradrenaline which is already high for blood type Os.

Overall, type Os have a hardy digestive tract, a strong immune system, natural defenses against infections, an efficient metabolism, shorter small intestines, and less chance for cancer. Health risks for type Os are typically low thyroid, inflammation, arthritis, blood-clotting disorders and ulcers, because type Os get overly acidic.

Curious to learn more about the characteristics of your blood type? Visit Peter J. D’Adamo’s site and learn all about your blood type diet and lifestyle.

sources:

http://www.outofstress.com/

http://www.dadamo.com/

Spicy Crunchy Roasted Chickpeas

Crunchy, salty, and packed with protein, chickpeas are the perfect snack. Just one cup of chickpeas has 39 grams of protein! I can eat a whole batch of spicy chickpeas in one sitting, so the recipe below is two servings worth. This recipe is SO simple! All you have to do is season the chickpeas with spices and olive oil, toss them, and roast them!

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Ingredients

-2 (15 oz) cans chickpeas (garbanzo beans), thoroughly rinse and drain

-2 tablespoons EVOO

-1 teaspoon cumin

-1 teaspoon chili powder

-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

-1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

1. Heat oven to 400 degrees F.  Place rack in the middle of the oven.

2. Put chickpeas in a bowl with all spices and olive oil.  Evenly coat the chickpeas, then place on a lined cookie sheet.  Roast in the oven for 40 minutes or longer depending on how crispy you prefer you want them.

8 Tips to Help Yourself Eat Better During the Week

We are busy people and not enough of us make the time to take care of our health. Eating well is much easier when we plan ahead, and even easier when we get other people involved.  When we designate one day for food prep, we allow ourselves more time during the week to rest, relax, and enjoy our pre-prepped food.  I recommend Sunday as the day for cooking and preparation.  This way, when our lives our full of stress and things to do, we have pre-prepped meals to look forward to.

Top tips for eating better during the week:

1. Make a batch of your favorite whole grains 

Whole grains can be very versatile.  I love to cook a big thing of rice or quinoa that’ll last me through the week. For breakfast I personally love putting eggs over rice with avocado and hot sauce, and then for other meals top the rice with vegetables or other forms of protein.  Fried rice is an easy enough recipe that’s always a favorite.  For more information and a list of all whole grains, click here.

2. Designate one day for prepping

As mentioned above, one of the most useful tips I have is to prep ahead of time. On your designated prep day, slice all your veggies, cook your whole grains, and soak your beans.  This saves time and makes eating healthy more realistic.

3.  Cook once, eat twice (or more!)

Prepare enough food while cooking to have leftovers.  Take advantage of the time you have to cook, because it can be hard to guarantee you’ll have time or even want to cook the rest of the week.

4. Keep a food journal

It’s easy to forget the meals we eat.  If your goal is to lose weight or discover what foods work best for your body, I always advise my clients to keep a food journal. Keeping a food journal not only helps us track what we eat eat and our portion sizes, but we can note things we are feeling emotionally or physically when we eat or after we eat. Identifying our emotions or even things we are feeling physically from eating helps us pinpoint food intolerances or allergies, and can even answer questions about other physical ailments.

From my own experience, it wasn’t until I started noting how I felt physically and emotionally after I ate processed foods and sugar that I was able to solve feelings of anxiety and depression. I realized those foods made me physically sick to my stomach, and I was also experiencing high levels of serotonin while eating the food, and suffering from low dopamine levels after the sugar high wore off.  Most of us probably aren’t conscious of these things as we’re eating and going about our lives, but once we stop and think about it, we may discover things we didn’t realize about our bodies.

6. Cook at home

I love going out to eat.  It’s convenient, there are lots of options, and the food tastes pretty good, but why not save some money and calories by cooking yourself?  When we eat out, there’s no way of controlling what exactly goes into our food.  I enjoy cooking because I know exactly where my food comes from, I have control over what I put in my food, and I get to pick what I want to eat.  Aim to eat at least two homemade meals a day, then work toward three meals at home a day.

7. Plan your meals

It’s much easier to eat well during the week if we take some time to plan meals ahead of time.  Make a grocery list and write out what you plan to eat every day. There’s no need to get fancy.  If you like having oatmeal for breakfast every morning and vegetable stir fry for dinner, then go for it!

8. Add in vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruit, and whole grains

By adding in more vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruit, and whole grains to our diet, we can naturally crowd out unhealthier foods and prevent unhealthy food cravings.  When we fill up on foods that nourish our body, we become more satisfied quicker, so we’re less likely to go for the desserts or snacks after we eat.

Looking for more tips?  Subscribe to my newsletter!

Pay me a visit at www.jkhealthcoach.com to learn more about how working with a health coach can benefit you and the ones you love!

Back to Basics

Words to live by, literally…
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Today I wanted to take a look at the difference between our modern diet and the way we ate as hunter-gatherers.  Our modern diet looks nothing like what our ancestors ate.  Americans consume way more sugar, salt, unnatural flavors, and chemicals.  In fact, even if you handed your great-great grandmother a brightly packaged box of Oreos, she probably wouldn’t even know what to make of it, let alone it eat it.

Below is some information on how our diet has changed.  Most of us need to curb our sugar and salt intake and the consumption of processed foods.  To do this, add in lots of whole foods (like vegetables and fruits), which will crowd out the quantity of foods we shouldn’t be eating.

Hunter-Gatherer Diet:                                       Contemporary Diet:

Carbohydrates:
>100 species veggies & fruit                               < 10 species veggies & fruit
>100 grams of fiber daily                                    < 20 grams of fiber daily
>Roots, legumes, berries                                    Sugars, sweeteners, grains

Protein and Fat:
 Game meats –deer, bison                               Feedlot cattle & poultry
 High Protein/high cholesterol                           Half the % of protein/high cholesterol
 More omega-3 fatty acids                                More omega-6 fatty acids

Vitamins and Minerals:
 Much less sodium                                            Much more sodium
Much more potassium                                      Much less potassium
1.5-5 x levels of vitamins                                  Lost in processing & storage

2002 Fred Peshkow MD, FACC