4 Ways to Motivate Yourself When All You Want Is To Do Nothing At All

I was inspired to write this post based off how I currently feel on this cold, foggy day.  I’m working from home, and I want nothing more than to cuddle up with my dogs and hibernate.  However, that’s not an option as work has to be done. So, what do I do to motivate myself?  Here are some tips that work for me, so if you can relate to what I’m saying, please try these suggestions out!

 

1. Eat fat. 

Our brains are made up of about 60% fat and need fat to promote clear thinking and focus. Outdated research suggested people stay away from products containing fat, so for me growing up I typically ate fat-free products.  I can’t tell you how relieved I am to now know that healthy fats are actually an essential part of our diet.  Foods like avocado, salmon, coconut oil, organic grass-fed butter and egg yolks are all examples of healthy fats that most people should consume on a daily basis.  I personally don’t eat much dairy, but it makes me sad that I deprived myself of the delicious goodness that is whole milk and 2% Greek yogurt for so many years.  Fat-free products not only taste unsatisfying, but they are typically packed with preservatives and hidden sugars in attempt to improve flavor.  By eating more fat, especially earlier in the day, you can power your brain, enhance learning and memory, and protect yourself again future brain diseases.

To give you an idea of how I fit fats into my diet, here is an example of what I might eat in a day:

Early Morning Meal — My Daily Green Smoothie, which always includes chia seeds and hemp seeds

Breakfast — Two eggs fried in either ghee or coconut oil with vegetables sautéd in either coconut oil or olive oil over rice.

Lunch — Mixed green salad with avocado and a little olive oil with lemon and lime for dressing.

Snack — Apple with almond butter.

Dinner — Baked salmon with steamed broccoli over quinoa.

Fat sources for the day = chia seeds, hemp seeds, egg yolks, ghee, coconut oil, avocado, olive oil, almond butter and salmon.  If you focus on eating whole foods, it’s not so hard to get your daily fat!

 

2. Experiment with Essential Oils

Aromatherapy has been used for thousands of years to improve mood, aid with sleep, energize, fight disease, and so much more.  There’s pretty much an essential oil for just about anything you can think of.  For me, after years of taking pharmaceuticals to manage ADHD, essential oils, in addition to diet, have become my all-natural solution for staying focused.  There are different oils you can use, and there are also oils made of a combination of different scents.  My absolute favorite oil is by DoTerra and it’s called InTune.  It’s a combination of several oils, but it’s my go-to scent whenever it’s time to get working.  Other oils that work well, which are mostly found in InTune, are lavender, Roman chamomile, mandarin, ylang ylang (I love this scent!), frankincense (I love this one too!),  vetiver, and patchouli.

 

3. Use Cannabis

This recommendation might sound counterintuitive and also may not be a solution for everyone.  For me, I have found with certain strains of cannabis that I can manage my ADHD-tendencies.  I do live in California where just about anyone can get a medical marijuana card, so apologies to those of you who unfortunately don’t have access to legal medicine.  For those of you who do, certain strains can actually give you clarity, laser-sharp focus, and can get those creative juices flowing.  Of course, it’s always important to consult your doctor or bud tender first, since they will be able to recommend the best strains for your specific needs, but definitely ask if cannabis can be a good solution for you too.

 

4. Set Daily Goals 

There’s something about writing out your daily to-do list that makes it much easier to get work done during the day.  I think it’s because lists hold you accountable and help with time management.  I actually prefer to write my list the night before, so that I can know exactly what needs to be done when I wake up the following day.

The other part of goal setting, especially when you’re feeling unmotivated, is to set what I call “power hour” goals.  It doesn’t necessarily need to be an hour, but what I’ll do is set a timer for typically about 20-30 minutes and during this time I have to stay completely focused on one task, like writing a blog post.  When my timer goes off I then allow myself a five minute break to walk around and stretch. Sometimes on my break I even let myself check Facebook 🙂  The point is that this system forces my lazy brain to work hard with the promise of a reward.  Because I get to take breaks I don’t get burnt out this way, not to mention I get in a little exercise!

 

For more tips like these, please leave a comment or drop me a line on my website.  Let’s talk!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Up With Your New Years Resolutions

New Years Resolutions are a funny thing. It’s as if we wait all year to make promises to ourselves to be our best selves- to work harder, exercise more often, eat better, drink less- that, let’s be real, do not last long. We should really be making these self-improvement goals every day of our lives, but instead we believe that the start of a new year will bring real change. Wouldn’t it be nice to stay true to your goals without the stress or self-sabotage?  Yes, of course it would, but this can be challenging! Here are some tips to help keep you on course with your resolutions and health goals throughout the new year:

Create realistic and specific goals.

People often rush to set their resolution, and even more often want to make a big change in their lives (quit smoking, loose so-and-so many pounds) instead of setting realistic, planned out, step by step goals. When you don’t give yourself enough time to plan out your resolutions, you are not setting yourself up for success. To make a goal truly doable, one needs a thought-out plan of action based on self-reflection and understanding.

Remember learning about SMART goals?  SMART goals can be used as a guideline to form top-notch goals.  SMART stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely. It is important to answer the questions “who, what, where, which, when, why” when planning your goals. Who do you need to surround yourself with to achieve this goal?  Is it a gym buddy, or just a friend who can hold you accountable?  What do you want to accomplish? Where do you need to be to work towards your goal? Identify a location and establish a time frame in which this goal will take place. Which requirements and restraints will you face? And why are you working toward this goal in the first place? Are the details of the goal realistic? Nailing down the specifics will make it much easier to get what you want. Here is an example to help:

 

  • Specific = I want to get to my optimal weight. I’ll schedule accountability calls with my friend for five minutes every Friday evening.
  • Measurable = I will drop 8 lbs in the next six months.
  • Attainable = I will accomplish this goal by cutting out soda and all packaged food and by walking for 30 minutes five days/week outside.
  • Realistic = This goal is something I can accomplish within the set timeframe.
  • Time = Accomplish this six months from today.

Make the necessary preparations.

Once you’ve set your specific game plan, it is now time to take the steps toward success. Depending on your resolution, this could mean emptying the pantry of all processed foods and sugar, or maybe it’s getting your gym membership before your intended start date for your new workout schedule. I can’t stress enough how key it is to find people either with similar goals who you can surround yourself with, or people who will be a good source of support. One of the reasons why people tend to fall short of their goals is because there is no support system in place. It is a lot easier to give up or flake on yourself when you feel you’re working alone. Even scheduling a five minute call once a week with an accountability partner can do the trick.

Do not create resolutions that overly restrict yourself.

This goes back to lesson 1: create realistic goals.  It’s nice in theory to think that you can go from eating chocolate every day to never touching it again, but this probably isn’t realistic. If you over restrict yourself this can be a recipe for self-sabotage (think late night ice cream binges) or can just cause disruption with your endocrine system from too much stress. Instead of going overboard and completely depriving yourself, lighten up just a little and create rules like the three-bite rule (only have three bites of sweets a day) or instead of doing cardio five days a week, do cardio for four days and take a relaxing yoga class on the fifth day. Whatever your resolution is, there is likely a way to stay on track without seemingly punishing yourself. And remember, if you mess up, don’t be too hard on yourself!  Learn to forgive and start over. Negative self-talk won’t do you any good.

Looking for some extra accountability with your goals from a professional health coachSign up for a complimentary 50-minute consultation with me and we can discuss the best ways to help keep you on track!

Please Join Me For Some Health Talks

This Fall I’m excited to announce I will be hosting some health talks!  If you live in or around the Bay Area, then please join me for the following events:

1. Health Coaching: A Tool To Optimize Your Health

Learn how health coaching can help you reach your health and nutrition goals. We’ll discuss what health coaches do, what outcomes can be achieved and whether working with a health coach is right for you.

When: Tuesday, September 8 from 6:00pm-7:00pm

Where: Jewish Community Center, 3200 California Street, San Francisco

Price: Free

Heart-Health

2. Wellness For Women: A Three-Part Series for Overall Health

Week 1: Creating Balance In Your Life

Learn how to nourish your body and create balance in your life by focusing on the importance of quality relationships, career, spirituality, physical exercise, and nutrition.

Week 2: Choosing the Best Foods For Your Health

The foods we eat affect our mental and physical wellbeing. Welcome to Whole Food School 101, where you’ll learn how to choose the best foods for your health.

Week 3: Dealing With Food Cravings Caused By Emotional Eating

Learn about the effects of sugar on the body, how to deconstruct your sugar cravings, and how to reduce sugar intake to improve health and longevity.

When: Tuesday, October 6, 13, 20th from 6:00pm-7:15pm

Where: Jewish Community Center, 3200 California St., San Francisco 

Price: $75 for members and $90 for non-members

About Me

unnamed-2Jessica Kleid is a native San Franciscan who’s always been passionate about food, fitness and living well. She received her training as a health coach from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, where she studied over one hundred dietary theories and was trained in a variety of practical lifestyle coaching methods. Drawing on this knowledge, Jessica completely personalizes a “roadmap to health” that suits your unique body, lifestyle, preferences and goals.