Roasted Chickpea and Vegetable Pitas

I love me some fluffy, warm pita, but you don’t actually need to include it to enjoy this recipe if you’d prefer to leave it out.  The stars of this dish are the vegetables: roasted harissa cauliflower and honey carrots, crispy chickpeas, plus fresh, cooling radishes and pea shoots.  Paired with hummus, yogurt, and (optional) feta cheese and you have yourself a tasty meal filled with protein and veggies. Serve in a bowl, with whole grains or with warmed pita or naan. Don’t overcook the pita like I did in the photo above. Whoops.

 

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Roasted harissa cauliflower and honey carrots

 

 

Ingredients

(serves 4)

-1 can chickpeas, drained, rinsed & dried

-1 head cauliflower, chopped into florets

-2 carrots, thinly sliced into 1/4 inch pieces

-3 radishes, thinly sliced

-4 handfuls pea shoots

-parsley, chopped

-1 lemon, quartered

-1 tablespoon garlic powder

-2-4 tablespoons harissa paste

-2 tablespoons honey

-feta cheese (try sheep’s milk feta!  It’s easier to digest)

-1 cup Greek yogurt

-Hummus (homemade or store-bought)

-4 Pita or naan

-Olive oil

-salt, pepper

*Note — For this recipe, it is helpful if you have two sheet pans, but not necessary.  If you have sheets pans of different sizes, you can use the smaller one for the chickpeas and the larger one for the vegetables.  If you only have one sheet pan, just roast the chickpeas first then go on to roast the vegetables.

 

Instructions

  1. Heat stove to 400 F.  Line two sheet pans in foil. Wash and prep your vegetables.  In a small bowl, combine garlic powder, a squirt of harissa paste, about 1/4 cup olive oil, salt, and pepper.  In a large bowl, combine the rinsed chickpeas and half the seasoning from the smaller bowl. Toss to coat the chickpeas thoroughly.  Transfer the chickpeas to a sheet pan.  Roast 40 minutes, shaking the pan halfway through.
  2. While the chickpeas cook, add the cauliflower to the large bowl with the remaining seasoning.  Toss to coat, adding more flavoring or oil as necessary, then place on one side of the other sheet pan in an even layer.
  3. Add the carrots to the large bowl.  In the smaller bowl, whisk together olive oil and honey.  Add to the bowl of carrots and toss to combine, scraping up any leftover seasoning.  Lay the carrots out in an even layer on the sheet pan next to the cauliflower.  Once the chickpeas have cooked for 10 minutes, add the cauliflower and carrots to the oven and cook for 25-30 minutes, stirringly every 10 minutes. The vegetables should be tender and golden.
  4. While the food cooks, in another small bowl, combine the yogurt with garlic powder, chopped parsley, salt, and pepper.  Drizzle olive oil on top.
  5. Remove the chickpeas and vegetables from the oven and set aside to cool.  Sprinkle your pita with a few drops of water and add to the oven for 3 minutes.
  6. Spread hummus and yogurt on your pita, then top with the chickpeas and vegetables, radish, pea shoots, and feta. Drizzle with olive oil and divide the quartered lemons among the plates.  Enjoy!

Breakfast, Lunch, or Dinner: Veggie Frittata All Day

I’m pretty confident that even a novice chef can make a frittata. In fact, I recently made frittatas with a group of about 20 kids under the age of 12 and they were able to make some delicious frittatas. Two of my favorite parts about frittatas is that you can get creative with your ingredients and a frittata is so great to have in the fridge for any meal of the day. Pick up some of your favorite vegetables, chop and sautée them, whisk some eggs, add some cheese (optional), put it all together and put in the oven for 10 minutes. Incredibly simple.

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Ingredients 

-1 handful mushrooms

-1 bunch broccolini (you’ll probably only use about 1/4-1/2 of the bunch)

-1/2 zucchini

-3/4 cup peas (defrost, if frozen)

-6 eggs (preferably organic)

-1 tablespoon milk (goat milk often works great for people with dairy sensitivities)

-goat cheese crumbles

-salt, pepper, red pepper chili flakes

-extra virgin olive oil

Steps

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
  2. Defrost peas. Chop the other vegetables into small pieces.
  3. Sautée vegetables all together in oven-safe pan** with olive oil for about 3 minutes. Add a dash of salt and pepper. **(If you don’t have an oven-safe pan than have an 8×8 baking dish/brownie pan available for later and whatever skillet you have).
  4. Meanwhile, whisk eggs with milk in a medium-sized bowl. Add the goat cheese crumbles (as much as you’d prefer) and stir. Add more salt and pepper and add chili flakes.
  5. If you have an oven-safe pan, add eggs to veggies and cook on the stove top for about 30 seconds to brown slightly, then place in the oven for 10 minutes. If you don’t have an oven-safe pan, then transfer the veggies and eggs to the baking dish and place in the oven for 10 minutes. Make sure the vegetables are evenly coated with egg.
  6. After 10 minutes your frittata should be looking ready to eat. If you’d like it brown a little more then leave it in the oven for a few extra minutes.

ENJOY

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You Are Invited! Slim Down For Summer and Join Me For A Summer Anti-Inflammation Detox

17327_10204034803084733_8189935535209272625_nWho else wants to feel totally energized, vibrant, and renewed this summer? Who wants to feel the best they’ve ever felt, lose some weight, and think more clearly than ever before? If this speaks to you, then join me this summer for an anti-inflammation detox and elimination diet!

Is a detox right for you? 

• Do you have trouble concentrating and/or staying focused?

• Do you feel tired or lethargic?
• Do you experience frequent colds or flues?
• Do you have joint pain or stiffness?

• Do you get frequent headaches?
• Are you overweight?
• Have you had a change in body odor or taste in your mouth?
• Do you have dark circles under your eyes?
• Does you skin lack luster?
• Do you have acne, eczema, or psoriasis?
• Do you have constipation (less than one bowel movement/day)?

• Do you have gas, bloating, or indigestion?
• Do you look puffy or bloated?
• Do you have high cholesterol or fatty liver disease?

If you answered “yes” to any of the following questions, then consider detoxing!

What is a detox?

A detox removes toxins from the body, almost like a “spring clean” for the soul to renew your inner self. We are exposed to numerous toxins every day, whether it’s through the air we breath, the food we eat, or the products we use. Stress is a very large contributor to inflammation too, and is also responsible for 75-90% of hospital visits.

As a result of all these toxins in our system, our body becomes inflamed. Although inflammation is typically the body’s natural, healthy immune response (think redness, soreness, or swelling), chronic inflammation often flies under the radar, disengaging the inflammation shut-off button. Chronic, low-level inflammation is also known as the “silent killer,” because it develops without pain and research shows it can lead to obesity, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and heart disease among other illnesses.

There are different types of detoxes out there, but I want to focus on the anti-inflammation detox, because reducing levels of inflammation is SO critical for achieving optimum health and avoiding big health problems down the road. This anti-inflammation detox focuses on hormone balance, limiting stress levels, improving sleep, and the elimination diet, which are all important factors that’ll contribute to abundant health and wellbeing. Hormones control everything in our body from the reproductive system to mood, energy levels, sleep, and appearance. All of the sources I previously mentioned that cause inflammation also can cause hormonal imbalances, and create symptoms like irritability, fatigue, inability to lose weight, unhealthy food cravings, and even conditions like diabetes, osteoporosis, or heart disease.

Health Benefits To Expect From This Detox:

  • Improved hormonal balance and fat burning with better liver function.
  • Relief from the effects of harmful excess estrogen (sex hormone).
  • Reduced insulin and less inflammation.
  • Restored serotonin activity and enhanced mood, memory, and focus.
  • Maximized activity of thyroid hormone (energy hormone).
  • Support of the breakdown and clearance of cortisol (stress hormone) from the body.
  • Better appetite control, freedom from cravings, and enhanced fat burning through improved leptin levels.
  • Diminished cellulite.

From this detox you will also learn to identify food sensitivities and allergies, which I will get into more just below.

Detox Details

1. Media Detox

This portion of the detox might be hardest for most. Although you will not need to abstain from media entirely, the more you can power down (especially before bed), the better. This will help greatly to reduce stress levels and improve sleep.

2. Restorative Sleep

Getting quality sleep is extremely important for balancing hormones and reducing inflammation.  It also makes it easier for us to stick with our health goals.

3. Replace home goods, cleaning products, and beauty products with natural, chemical-free products

Although this can be costly, over time I recommend switching out products for natural, chemical-free, or homemade versions to reduce and eliminate toxins. Think about it, over 80,000 industrial chemicals have been developed in the last 80 years, and these chemicals are found in almost every commercial product you use! These chemicals completely disrupt hormone balance and contribute to life-threatening illnesses.

4. Stress Management

Most of us suffer from stress in some way, whether it’s environmental, from food, work-related, relationship-related, personal, or psychological. When stress goes untreated, it suppresses the body’s immune system and ultimately manifests as illness. Stress is also a huge contributor to digestive troubles. Throughout this detox I will be coaching participants on ways to reduce and eliminate stress, since stress also leads to inflammation!

5. The Elimination Diet

It’s hard to pinpoint food allergies or sensitivities, so this part of the detox will help you discover your trigger foods. Over 10 days, we will eliminate some of the most toxic or most commonly allergenic foods from the diet: sugar, processed foods and hydrogenated oils, alcohol, caffeine, corn, dairy, cigarettes, red meats, citrus fruit, peanuts, night shade vegetables, and gluten.

Don’t freak out. You may be thinking “well what’s left for me to eat?,” but that’s where I step in.  Not only will I be coaching you through this process, but I will also set up a support system with the rest of the group members. I will provide you with delicious recipes, meal plans, and whole food education, and don’t forget, I will be joining you for this detox too!

After the ten days of the elimination diet, then the real work starts. Over the course of about three weeks you will begin to reintroduce one food at a time back to your diet. Introduce a food, see how you feel after eating it for two days, then eliminate that food again and start with a new food for two days. This process repeats itself until you’ve tested out all types of inflammatory foods.

The great thing about this detox is that you will feel so much better afterwards that it’ll be easier to incorporate this type of eating on your own.  You’ll be resetting and refreshing your body, so you may even notice that you might not even crave some of the foods you used to crave before, making healthy eating way more convenient!

What You’ll Get With This Detox

For $50.00 (USD), you will receive health coaching, group support, recipes, meal plans, and tips to set yourself up for lasting health improvements!  My health coaching services are normally triple this rate, so take advantage of this opportunity!

Here is what to expect:

-the anti-inflammation overview packet

  • information I’ve compiled about the detox
  • detox Q & A
  • list of foods to eliminate
  • list of foods to include
  • types of activities to include

-tips and tricks that’ll help with the detox, but will also help you after the detox

  • stress management techniques
  • whole food education
  • identifying and deconstructing cravings
  • group health coaching with check ins a couple times a week
  • helpful tips to help you through the detox

-recipes and meal plan

  • a sample meal plan for 10 days
  • recipes for every meal

-group support

  • access to a Facebook support group with other members
  • a partner to share triumphs and set backs with and to have as an accountability coach
  • I’ll be regularly posting tips and tricks here to help with the detox

-unlimited email support with me

  • I’ll be available to answer any questions via email

Join Me!

If this detox speaks to you, then please write me an email so I’ll have your contact information!  This detox will begin the week of July 13, 2015, but it is important to give yourself at least a week leading up to the beginning of the detox to get yourself ready!

You can reach me via email at jessicakhealth@gmail.com and don’t forget to visit my website and sign up for my newsletter www.jkhealthcoach.com.

5 Healthy Breakfast Recipes Your Kids Will Love!

breakfastIt’s so important to have a nutritious breakfast.  You want your kids to start the morning with something that’ll fuel them for a large portion of their day.  I believe superfoods, protein, complex carbohydrates, healthy fats, vitamins, and fiber are all vital for energy, sharp focus, growth, a strong immune system, vibrant skin, and healthy digestion.

BEWARE

Steer clear of sugary breakfast foods and beware of misleading labels.  Sugar is addictive and horrible for your health, so power your kids with something nutritious in the morning instead! Juice also has a lot of sugar in it and lacks the fiber that fruit provides. Your kids may show symptoms of an intolerance too (milk is a common one), so for a morning beverage, try a healthy smoothie or fruit-infused waters. Lemon, cucumber, berries…any combination that tastes good in your water. I keep a large container of infused water in my fridge so it’s convenient at any time.  If you have fizzy water you can add fruit to that too.

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EAT THIS

Here are five breakfast recipes that will taste like a treat!

  • chia seed pudding – Chia seeds are packed with protein, omega-3s, fiber, calcium, and antioxidants. When the chia seeds expand in liquid they become gelatinous, and that actually helps cleanse your digestive system. I love chia seed pudding too because there are so many ways to have it! Chocolate, strawberry, almond, coconut, etc… If your kids are up for trying this I think they might like it!
  • banana peanut butter open face sandwich  Bananas are great. They offer fiber, a ton of potassium, and lots of vitamins. They sustain blood sugar and boost energy. Add some peanut butter and nuts on top for protein, healthy fat, and fiber among other vitamins which will all naturally provide energy for longer periods of time without a huge crash like you get after eating sugar.
  • Bacon, Eggs, and Apple Slices – Believe it or not, if you buy quality bacon and pastured eggs and you add some apple, you got a well balanced meal. There are so many ways to quickly make eggs. If you can get your kid to do a scramble one day and add some vegetables that would be awesome! Look for nitrate free, or uncured, bacon. It doesn’t have added chemicals. This meal will give your kid protein and fiber, and if you cook the eggs in a healthier oil like extra virgin olive oil or a little quality organic butter, then your kid will also get brain-fueling, healthy fat. I recommend using one egg yolk for every two egg whites. The whites have all the protein, and the yolk contains the healthy fat.
  • french toast with berries – French toast was always one of my childhood favorites. However, I remember always feeling sick after eating it (especially after drenching the toast in Aunt Jemima syrup). This recipe uses healthier substitutes like cottage cheese and almond milk, which eliminates some of the dairy that many kids are intolerant to.
  • Jessica’s superfood smoothie (serves 2) – I love starting my morning off with this energizing smoothie. It’s full of antioxidants, fiber, vitamins, protein, and omegas. I add a handful of spinach to my drink, but that’s totally optional. I blend:

1 cup unsweetened almond milk

1/2 cup organic strawberries

1 banana

1/2 cup blueberries

1/2 cup raspberries

1 tablespoon chia seeds, 1 tablespoon flaxseed, 1 tablespoon hemp seed (I eyeball it for all the seeds)

1 scoop maca powder (amazing health benefits)

2 teaspoons bee pollen (high in protein!)

1 tablespoon cacao nibs

Blend everything and enjoy this energy drink. Serve alongside some avocado toast.

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FYI- some of the seeds and maca powder can be found for a better price in the bulk bins at Whole Foods.

8 Tips to Help Yourself Eat Better During the Week

We are busy people and not enough of us make the time to take care of our health. Eating well is much easier when we plan ahead, and even easier when we get other people involved.  When we designate one day for food prep, we allow ourselves more time during the week to rest, relax, and enjoy our pre-prepped food.  I recommend Sunday as the day for cooking and preparation.  This way, when our lives our full of stress and things to do, we have pre-prepped meals to look forward to.

Top tips for eating better during the week:

1. Make a batch of your favorite whole grains 

Whole grains can be very versatile.  I love to cook a big thing of rice or quinoa that’ll last me through the week. For breakfast I personally love putting eggs over rice with avocado and hot sauce, and then for other meals top the rice with vegetables or other forms of protein.  Fried rice is an easy enough recipe that’s always a favorite.  For more information and a list of all whole grains, click here.

2. Designate one day for prepping

As mentioned above, one of the most useful tips I have is to prep ahead of time. On your designated prep day, slice all your veggies, cook your whole grains, and soak your beans.  This saves time and makes eating healthy more realistic.

3.  Cook once, eat twice (or more!)

Prepare enough food while cooking to have leftovers.  Take advantage of the time you have to cook, because it can be hard to guarantee you’ll have time or even want to cook the rest of the week.

4. Keep a food journal

It’s easy to forget the meals we eat.  If your goal is to lose weight or discover what foods work best for your body, I always advise my clients to keep a food journal. Keeping a food journal not only helps us track what we eat eat and our portion sizes, but we can note things we are feeling emotionally or physically when we eat or after we eat. Identifying our emotions or even things we are feeling physically from eating helps us pinpoint food intolerances or allergies, and can even answer questions about other physical ailments.

From my own experience, it wasn’t until I started noting how I felt physically and emotionally after I ate processed foods and sugar that I was able to solve feelings of anxiety and depression. I realized those foods made me physically sick to my stomach, and I was also experiencing high levels of serotonin while eating the food, and suffering from low dopamine levels after the sugar high wore off.  Most of us probably aren’t conscious of these things as we’re eating and going about our lives, but once we stop and think about it, we may discover things we didn’t realize about our bodies.

6. Cook at home

I love going out to eat.  It’s convenient, there are lots of options, and the food tastes pretty good, but why not save some money and calories by cooking yourself?  When we eat out, there’s no way of controlling what exactly goes into our food.  I enjoy cooking because I know exactly where my food comes from, I have control over what I put in my food, and I get to pick what I want to eat.  Aim to eat at least two homemade meals a day, then work toward three meals at home a day.

7. Plan your meals

It’s much easier to eat well during the week if we take some time to plan meals ahead of time.  Make a grocery list and write out what you plan to eat every day. There’s no need to get fancy.  If you like having oatmeal for breakfast every morning and vegetable stir fry for dinner, then go for it!

8. Add in vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruit, and whole grains

By adding in more vegetables, nuts, legumes, fruit, and whole grains to our diet, we can naturally crowd out unhealthier foods and prevent unhealthy food cravings.  When we fill up on foods that nourish our body, we become more satisfied quicker, so we’re less likely to go for the desserts or snacks after we eat.

Looking for more tips?  Subscribe to my newsletter!

Pay me a visit at www.jkhealthcoach.com to learn more about how working with a health coach can benefit you and the ones you love!

Zucchini Fritters

Looking for a fast, delicious way to prepare zucchini?  Then try some zucchini fritters!

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All you need is a skillet, a clean dish towel or cheese cloth, a food processor or box grater.  There aren’t too many ingredients, so this can definitely be a budget-friendly meal.

Serves 1-2 people

Ingredients:

-2 medium-sized zucchini, grated (using box grater or a food processor)

-1/4 cup flour (use coconut flour for a gluten-free version)

-2 cloves garlic, minced

-1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese

-1 large egg, beaten

-salt and pepper

-2 tablespoons EVOO (extra virgin olive oil)

Optional:

-1-2 avocado

-hot sauce

Instructions

1. Place grated zucchini in a colander over the sink. Add salt and gently toss to combine; let sit for 10 minutes.

2. Using a clean dish towel or cheese cloth, drain zucchini completely.

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Squeeze cloth to remove excess water from the zucchini.

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Come on, SQUEEZE!  (Look at that concentration!)

3. In a large bowl, combine zucchini, flour, Parmesan, garlic and egg; season with salt and pepper, to taste.

4. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium high heat. Scoop tablespoons of batter for each fritter, flattening with a spatula, and cook until the underside is nicely golden brown, about 2 minutes. Flip and cook on the other side, about 1-2 minutes longer.

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5. Smash the avocado in a bowl using a mallet or spoon.  Scoop the avocado onto the zucchini fritters and add hot sauce to your liking.  Serve immediately and enjoy!

Original Recipe: damndelicious.net

What to do with Beans (plus recipe!)

Beans are a fantastic, nutrient-dense, protein-packed plant food that offer tons of fiber, B vitamins,iron, antioxidants, and phytonutrients. They are low in calories and have been found to lower the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

I think a lot of people are intimidated by cooking beans, possibly because they don’t know how.  Up until recently, actually, I had been using canned beans.  It wasn’t until I started soaking (non-canned) beans properly, which was quite simple to do, that I noticed my body could easily digest beans, where as normally I feel like crap after eating beans.

Cooking Beans

-Be sure to wash and clean the beans first.

-Soak dried beans for 8-12 hours before cooking (hint: cut a bean in half; if the center is still opaque, keep soaking).

-After soaking, rinse, fill pot with fresh water (about 4-6 cups), bring to a boil, then skim off the foam.  To aid digestion, add kombu, bay leaf, cumin, anise, or fennel to the water.

-Cover and simmer for the suggested time.

-Remember: Only add salt at the end of cooking (about 10 minutes before the beans are done) or it will interfere with the cooking process.

Quick tips: For speedier prep, boil dried beans for 5 minutes, then soak for 2-4 hours. Or use canned beans instead (some people find them even easier to digest!).  Be sure to avoid canned beans with added salt or preservatives and rinse thoroughly once removed from the can.

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Kombu is a type of dried seaweed. Add a small piece while cooking your beans to improve digestibility.

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Cooking with Beans

Need ideas of how to use beans?  Try any of the following:

-Toss beans and diced veggies (such as celery, shallots, red peppers) with vinaigrette for a quick bean salad.

-Blend cooked beans with tomatoes, onions, and your favorite seasonings to create a yummy bean soup.

-Top a green salad with 1/3 cup of your favorite bean.

-Puree beans with a bit of olive oil, a garlic clove, salt, and your favorite seasonings. Voila! A fast dip or sandwich spread.

-Include 1/3 cup of beans with your other favorite toppings next time you make stuffed baked potatoes or sweet potatoes.

-Add 1/4 cup pureed beans to your favorite pancake, waffle, muffin, or cake recipe. You’ll be surprised at how moist and springy baked goods are when baked with beans.

Here’s what I made…

After soaking black beans overnight, I decided to use the beans for a Mexican shrimp bowl.  At least that’s what I’m calling it.  Feel free to pick and choose your favorite ingredients, but here’s what I used to cook for two people:

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-avocado (1/2)

-shrimp (about 12)

-4 garlic gloves, minced

-1/2 onion, diced

-fresh, dried chilies, minced (if you like your food spicy)

-salt, pepper

-2 tbsp olive oil, plus more if needed

-optional: rice or polenta cubes, red cabbage

unnamed-3To prepare this dish I soaked the black beans over night and then cooked them in 6 cups water with a strip of kombu for an hour.

-Heat large pan with olive oil.  When hot, add onions and garlic and cook for two minutes.  Lightly salt.

-Add shrimp, chilis, salt, and pepper.   If cooking pre-made polenta, toss in polenta cubes.  Cook for about five minutes or until shrimp are cooked.

-Layer red cabbage and beans on the bottom of a bowl.  Add the shrimp, onions, and polenta on top.  Slice up some avocado and serve!

Chicken Parmesan

chicken p 2I lived in New York for four years and never had chicken parmesan better than my own.  Chicken Parmesan is an Italian favorite, definitely one of my man’s favorites, and just seems to be a crowd pleaser.  This dish goes great with pasta, zoodles (zucchini noodles), vegetables, or a side salad.  I like to make extras and have it available to eat throughout the week, using the leftovers to make chicken parm sandwiches.

Personally, I prefer homemade breadcrumbs, but some people still prefer store bought seasoned or plain breadcrumbs.  If you decide to make your own breadcrumbs, it’s easy.  All you need is some day old bread or defrosted bread broken into bite-sized pieces.  Throw the pieces in a food processor or blender and blend until you have crumbs.  I season my breadcrumbs with some dried basil and dried oregano, but that’s also optional.  When using herbs, crush and rub the herbs between your hands, because this will release more flavor.chicken p 3

For the sauce, I admit, I buy this freshly made red sauce I love from the store because I’m a little particular about my sauce. Most bottled sauces, like Prego, are filled with sugar, so I recommend either buying fresh sauce or making it from scratch.

Ingredients:

6 boneless, skinless, organic chicken breasts

-1 1/2 cup breadcrumbs

-1/2 cup freshly grated Romano cheese + 3 tbsp for topping

-4 garlic cloves, peeled and finely diced

-Salt and pepper

-2 large eggs, well beaten

-1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, plus extra if needed

-8 ounces fresh mozzarella, 1/4 inch thick slices

-3-4 cups marinara sauce of choice

Steps:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

2. Wash chicken and pat dry.  Place chicken breasts in large plastic ziplock bag or between sheets of plastic wrap or wax paper.  Pound chicken with a mallet or hammer chicken with your fists (my own solution to not owning a mallet) on a flat surface until chicken breasts are about 1/2 inch thick.

3. On a dinner plate, add the bread crumbs, 1/2 the Romano cheese, garlic, salt, and pepper.  In a shallow bowl large enough to fit the chicken breasts, add eggs and 1 tbsp water, then beat with a fork.

4. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add oil.

5. Dip each chicken breast into the eggs and then into the breadcrumb mixture, coating each side. When the oil is hot, add the chicken to the pan and cook each side for about 3 minutes, or until lightly brown and not quite cooked.  Add any remaining breadcrumbs to the pan and fry, adding more olive oil as needed and keeping the bottom of the pan filled with 1/4 inch of oil.

6. In a 9 by 13-inch baking dish, cover the bottom of the dish with a 1 inch layer of red sauce.  Remove chicken and fried breadcrumbs from the skillet and arrange in the baking dish.  Pour another layer of sauce over the top of the chicken.  Cook chicken uncovered in the oven for 10 minutes.

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Layer red sauce on the bottom of a baking dish. Place cutlets and fried breadcrumbs in dish and layer more red sauce on top.

7. Remove chicken and top the chicken with the mozzarella and remaining Romano.  Place back in the oven uncovered for another 10-15 minutes, or until sauce bubbles and the mozzarella melts.

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Remove dish from oven after 10 minutes and cover with cheese. Bake for another 10-15 minutes.

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Nom nom, melted, cheesy goodness 🙂

Good Fats vs Bad Fats

Not everyone realizes there’s a distinction between fats that are good for us and fats that are not.  In fact, some fats are essential to our diets and we can’t live without them.  The word “fat” has a negative connotation, especially when well marketed products influence us to buy “diet,” “non-fat,” “light”/”lite,” or “low fat” foods.  The truth is, these “diet” foods aren’t any better for us, and compensate with processed sugar to still taste okay.  Sugar and processed foods, not so much fat, is the real problem with our diets.

To break it down, there are four different types of fat.  Two of these types are “good fats” and the other “bad fats.”

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are good for us. They benefit the heart, cholesterol, and overall health.

Saturated fats and trans fats are bad for us.  They increase the likelihood of disease and high cholesterol.

Beneficial fats are found in the following foods:

healthy-fatsMonounsaturated Fats:

-avocados

-nuts (almonds, pecans, hazelnuts, cashews, macadamia nuts, peanuts)

-olives

-oils (olive oil, canola, sunflower, peanut, sesame oil)

-Peanut Butter

Polyunsaturated fats:

-walnuts

-soymilk

-tofu

-flaxeed

-oils (soybean, corn, safflower)

-sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds

-fatty fishes (salmon, tuna, mackerel, herring, sardines, trout)

-flaxeed

Saturated Fat:

-chicken with the skin

-fatty cuts of meat (beef, lamb, pork)

-whole fat dairy products (cream, milk)

-butter

-lard

-cheese

-lard

*A note about saturated fat-  there has been controversy surrounding the argument that all saturated fat is bad for our health.  It’s true that substituting saturated fats for polyunsaturated fats is much healthier.  Use olive oil instead of butter, for example, but do not replace your saturated fats with processed food, like a muffin or bagel in the morning instead of bacon. Just don’t eat bacon all the time.

There are also newer studies that argue whole fat dairy products may actually keep us lean and decrease the chances of obesity.  One possibility is that whole fat dairy products keep us fuller longer, thus lessening the amount we consume.  That doesn’t mean go out and eat tons of whole fat dairy, especially for those of us who already have high cholesterol levels. (Source: NPR: The Full Fat Paradox)

fats 

Trans Fat:

-stick margarin

-packaged snack foods (crackers, microwave popcorn, chips, cookies)

-commercially baked pastries (doughnuts, cookies, cakes, pizza dough)

-vegetable shortening

-fried foods

-candy bars

(Source: HelpGuide.org)