Nourishing Rice Bowl

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Grains, protein, and veggies all in one dish.  Serve for breakfast, lunch, or dinner.

Ingredients

-1 cup sushi rice, cooked

-1 piece salmon

-2 eggs, scrambled

-1/2 cucumber

-1 head of broccoli

-green onions with white bottoms and green tops sliced thinly and separated

-sesame seeds

-2 tablespoons tamari

-1 tablespoon honey

-1 tablespoon olive oil, coconut oil, or toasted sesame oil

-1 teaspoon garlic powder

-salt, pepper

*Note- I typically eyeball ingredients, so measurements in instructions might be a little off.

 

Instructions

  1. Set oven to 400 degrees F.  Place salmon in a zip lock bag.  In a small bowl, combine and whisk together tamari, honey, olive oil, garlic powder, salt and pepper.  Pour the sauce into the bag with the fish and let the salmon marinate for at 10 minutes.  Save any remaining sauce.
  2. Toss broccoli and the whites of the onions in a large bowl with remaining sauce.  Add salt and pepper, plus some extra olive oil if necessary so that broccoli is evenly coated.
  3. Line a baking sheet with tin foil.  Place the salmon and vegetables on the baking sheet and cook in the oven for 15-20 minutes, depending on the thickness of the salmon.
  4. Slice cucumbers.  In a small skillet, scramble the eggs.  Remove eggs and put in a serving dish along with some sushi rice and the cucumbers.  Add the salmon and broccoli when they’ve finished cooking.  Sprinkle with the green tops of the onions and sesame seeds. Enjoy!

Healthy Wings Two Ways!

It’s nearly Fall again, which means it’s time for layers, pumpkin spiced everything and football.  With NFL season gearing up, I thought it would be appropriate to share a chicken wing recipe.  But not just one recipe, two recipes!

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My wings are no fry with no breading, and they’re ridiculously flavorful, mouthwatering and healthy.  I’m definitely proud of myself for these, as I just experimented in the kitchen and came out with something my friends loved.  I hope you enjoy these as much as I do!

Asian-Style Wings (aka, honey, garlic, five spice wings)

 

Ingredients

-6 organic chicken wings

-1 teaspoon sea salt

-1 teaspoon pepper

-1.5 teaspoons garlic powder

-1.5 teaspoons Chinese five spice

-1 teaspoon onion powder

-honey (preferably raw and locally-sourced)

-1 tablespoon melted ghee or butter

 

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Instructions

1- Heat oven to 450 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with tin foil and preheat the baking sheet.  Rinse chicken and pat completely dry with paper towels.  Place in a large plastic ziplock bag.

2- In a bowl, combine the spices and mix together.  Add the spices, about a tablespoon of honey and melted ghee/butter to the bag of chicken and shake to fully coat the chicken. Remove the baking sheet from the oven.  Place the chicken on the sheet and place in the oven for 20 minutes.  After 20 minutes, flip the chicken and cook for another 20 minutes.

3- Remove from the oven.  Lightly drizzle honey over the wings and serve.

 

 

Indian-Style Wings (aka, Crispy Wings)

 

Ingredients

-6 organic chicken wings

-1 teaspoon turmeric powder

-1 teaspoon curry powder

-1 teaspoon garam masala

-1 teaspoon coriander powder

-1 teaspoon garlic powder

-1 teaspoon onion powder

-1 teaspoon cumin

-1 teaspoon sea salt

-1 teaspoon pepper

-1 tablespoon melted ghee or butter

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Instructions

1) Heat oven to 450 degrees F.  Line a baking sheet with tin foil and preheat the baking sheet.  Rinse chicken and pat completely dry with paper towels.  Place in a large plastic ziplock bag.

2) In a bowl, combine the spices and mix together.  Add the spices and melted ghee/butter to the bag of chicken and shake to fully coat the chicken. Remove the baking sheet from the oven.  Place the chicken on the sheet and place in the oven for 20 minutes.  After 20 minutes, flip the chicken and cook for another 20 minutes.

3- Remove from the oven and serve.

 

Looking for more recipes?  Check out all my other recipes on my blog, or reach me on my website.

Chinese Green Beans With Pork

San Francisco is a city rich in culture and diversity, which is one of the greatest reasons why I’m obsessed with this city. Because I grew up in a densely Asian-populated neighborhood, my comfort foods have always been any kind of Asian dishes. I love the flavors and smells and have luckily found that many Asian dishes are fairly simple to replicate at home.

My friend and I made a stir-fry dish the other night with green beans, minced pork, garlic, scallions, and mushrooms that we put over rice. It was incredibly easy to make and had the same flavors as the food I’d buy at one of my favorite Chinese restaurants in the neighborhood where I grew up. Although we ate this dish with rice, I think it would also go well in lettuce cups for a lighter version, or even with noodles. I found the recipe on Tasty (accompanied by a straightforward cooking demo video), but my friend and I switched the recipe up a bit to make it our own. Here is our version:

c9aaa16c-cf47-4392-a960-e259bc575268.jpgIngredients

-1 lb. ground pork

-1 lb. green beans

-4 cloves garlic, diced

-4 scallions, chopped

-4 oz. shiitake mushrooms, chopped

-1 tbsp chili sauce

-dried red chili flakes (optional)

-2 tbsp tamari or soy sauce

-1 tbsp rice vinegar

-1/4 cup sesame oil

 

Instructions

1- In a wok or large pan, heat the sesame oil over high heat. When the oil is hot, add the string beans and cook until blistered. Remove from the pan and set aside.

2- Add more sesame oil if necessary to the pan. Add the scallions and garlic about a minute, or until fragrant. Add the mushrooms and ground pork. Once the pork has browned, stir in the chili sauce and add the red chili flakes. Then add the green beans back to the wok or pan and stir all together.

3- Add the soy sauce or tamari, rice vinegar, and a dash of pepper. Serve over rice or with lettuce cups, or just on its own. Enjoy!

 

Homemade Pad Thai

Pad thai

Here are the makings of a homemade pad thai with my very own twist.  I like to load up on delicious green vegetables, so here I went heavy on the broccoli, bok choy, and green onions and added shrimp for protein.  What I especially love about pad thai are the peanuts. I normally order a side of peanut sauce for my pad thai, but for this recipe I actually added peanut butter.  I happened to have a fancy vanilla bourbon peanut butter, but I’m sure any smooth peanut butter will do the trick.

Ingredients:

-shrimp

-bok choy

-broccoli

-3 cloves garlic

-green onions

-chilis

-2 eggs, lightly scrambled

-fish or oyster sauce

-smooth peanut butter

-lemon or lime

-sesame oil or coconut oil

-pad thai noodles or preferred rice noodlesANE-52793-4

Steps:

1. Heat a pot full of water for noodles. Cook noodles.  When done drain, but set aside some water. Run cold water over the noodles.

2. Meanwhile, heat sesame oil and a little coconut oil in wok or large pan over medium high heat.  Sautee garlic, bok choy, broccoli, and shrimp.  Add salt and pepper.  Flip shrimp after about 3 minutes and cook until opaque. Bok choy should be wilted and broccoli cooked.  Transfer vegetables and shrimp to dish.

3. Add about a teaspoon more oil to the pan and add eggs.  Scramble eggs and add noodles to the pan.  Add fish sauce and peanut butter.  Add shrimp, vegetables, and chilis and turn off stove.  Mix everything, squeeze some fresh lemon or lime, and add more sauce and peanut butter to taste.

Probiotics for Beginners

You may have been wondering what the kombucha hype is all about, and seriously, what the heck is tempeh anyway? Maybe you’ve heard of or seen probiotics before, but you don’t know why they’re important.  It’s also possible you’ve consumed probiotics, maybe most of your life, and didn’t realize.

Bandit wondering, what is this kombucha?

Bandit thinking, what is this kombucha stuff mom drinks?

TN_Lede_Probiotics_0911Our bodies contain around 100 trillion microbes, most of them bacteria, and some beneficial bacteria.  Probiotics are the good bacteria.  These living organisms reside in our colons and small intestine.  They keep our guts clean, aid in digestion and add bulk to solid wastes.  Probiotics also fight disease-causing microbes, and can help with health problems like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), infectious diarrhea, and antibiotic-related diarrhea (webmd). Probiotics are important to take while on antibiotics, since antibiotics cause a loss of healthy bacteria. home-care-options-abound-for-people-suffering-from-depression-in-home-care-support-services

Stress or poor diet might reduce the numbers of healthy bacteria in the small intestine as well, and vice versa, a lack of healthy bacteria has shown to trigger feelings of depression and anxiety when there’s an imbalance within the gut (beginwithnutrition).

There are different types of probiotics and various ways to consume them, either through supplements or through various foods.  Skip the supplements and experiment with eating some of the following foods:

Yogurt- Yogurt is made from fermented milk using certain bacteria, but only types labeled as containing live bacteria (“active cultures”) are actually probiotic.

Kefir- Similar to yogurt and contains sometimes up to ten diverse strains of good bacteria.  It’s fermented using a combination of bacteria and yeast with milk proteins and complex sugars.  Made from cow’s milk, goat’s milk, sheep’s milk, coconut milk, soy milk, or rice milk.  Kefir is a good choice if you’re lactose intolerant, because the lactose it once contained is broken down through fermentation.

Buttermilk– Made with strains of lactic acid-making bacteria added to regular pasteurized milk.

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Raw Milk- Maybe only five states in the U.S. actually allow the sale of raw milk and there are debated health risks, but raw milk drinkers swear by the stuff because of all the good bacteria.

Soy Milk- Must say “contains active cultures” on the label.

darkchocolateDark Chocolate- Certain types of high-quality chocolate contain probiotics.  Dark chocolate is also a source of antioxidants!

Miso- A staple of Japanese cuisine, miso is made with fermented soy, barley, wheat, or rice with a fungus that produces a red, white, or dark brown salty paste.  When cooking with miso, add it to hot foods at the end of cooking to preserve the probiotic cultures as much as possible.

Tempeh- High in proteins and minerals, tempeh also promotes intestinal health.  Tempeh originates in Indonesia and is made with cooked soybeans and an added fungus culture. It’s then fermented into a thick, meaty block.

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Natto- typical Japanese breakfast dish


N
atto- Made from fermented soybeans with a distinctive flavor, smell, and sticky texture.  Also a stap

le of the Japanese diet.

Kimchi- A pickled Chinese dish of cabbage, eggplant, or other vegetables fermented with red chili and other spices for at least a month.  Kimchi is full of fiber, vitamins, iron, and various types of probiotic bacteria.

Sauerkraut- German for “sour cabbage,” sauerkraut is made from fermented, finely shredded, salty cabbage and contains a variety of heathy bacteria.  Buy fresh sauerkraut that contains lives cultures, versus some commercial brands of sauerkraut.

Pickles- These crunchy treats contain lots of probiotics.

brew_dr_kombucha_smKombucha Tea- This Asian drink restores energy and aids digestion.

Olives- Olives in brine are probiotics, because the brine allows probiotics to survive and thrive.